NEW!
Introduction
Site Search
For Students
Veterans Roll Call
Speakers List
In Memory
Photo Album
History & Timeline
Documents
Letters From the Field
Our Words
Our Stories
Our Thoughts
Your Thoughts
Discussions
Poetry
Freedom Rides
Nonviolence
Web Links
Bibliography
Frequent Questions
Blog
Announcements
Release Form
Archive
About Us
Copyright
Privacy

Freedom Movement Bibliography

Children & Young Adult
General Audiences

See also:

Book Titles Grouped by Subject
Online Books, Audio, Film and Videos
Books Recommended by Movement Veterans
Movement-Related Web Links

(Note that except for the books recommended by Movement veterans, the resources listed here are provided as an information service only. Inclusion in these lists does not necessarily imply that they are approved, recommended, or endorsed by Movement veterans or this website.)

Children & Young Adult

Available in Bookstores, through Libraries, or online.

(Note that the recommended age ranges and grade levels shown here are supplied by the publishers or taken from commercial book reviewers, they are not based on any evaluation by this website. They are only a rough guideline because the reading level of individual children vary widely regardless of their age or grade.)

For teachers:

  • Putting the Movement Back into Civil Rights Teaching. A new resources for teaching about the Civil Rights Movement available on Teaching for Change's website: www.civilrightsteaching.org. Provides lessons and articles for K-12 educators on how to go beyond a heroes approach to the Civil Rights Movement. Included in the book are interactive, interdisciplinary lessons, readings, writings, photographs, graphics, and interviews.

  • Teaching the Civil Rights Movement: Freedom's Bittersweet Song, by Armstrong, Edwards, Roberson, and Williams. Routledge, 2002. Perspectives on presenting the movement in different classroom contexts. Includes sample syllabi and detailed descriptions from courses that prove effective. For high school and college teachers in history, education, race, sociology, literature and political science.

For young readers:

  • Abby Takes a Stand by Patricia C. McKissack, Gordon C. James (Illustrator). Viking Penguin, 2005. Nashville sit-in movement as seen by a 10-year old girl. Recommended for: Ages 8-12.

  • The Assasination Of Martin Luther King (American Moments Set II), by Alan Pierce. Abdo & Daughters Publishing, 2004. (Ages 9-12)

  • Assassination of Medgar Evers (Library of Political Assassinations), by Myra Ribeiro. Rosen Publishing Group, 2001. Biography and overview of the role Medgar played in the Movement, why he was killed by racists. Recommended for: Ages 4-9.

  • Black Women Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, by Zita Allen. Scholastic Library Publishing, 1996. The stories and bios of women who led the Movement. Recommended for: Grade 6 & up

  • The Bridge at Selma: Turning Points in American History, by Marilyn Miller. Silver Burdett Press, 1989. Story of the Selma march with many photos. Recommended for: Grades 5-8

  • Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case That Transformed Television, by Kay Mills. University Press of Mississippi, 2004. Struggle to revoke license of racist Jackson MS television station WLBT.

  • Church People in the Struggle: The National Council of Churches and the Black Freedom Movement, 1950-1970, by James Findlay. Oxford University Press, 1997.

  • Circle of Fire, by Evelyn Coleman. Pleasant Company Publications, 2001. 12 year old girl foils plot by KKK to firebomb Highlander Folk School and assasinate Eleanor Roosevelt. Recommended for: ages 9 to 12.

  • Civil Rights Act of 1964, by Robert H. Mayer (Editor). Greenhaven Press, 2004. Essays, articles, and history of the act. Recommended for: Grades 9-12.

  • Civil Rights Marches (Cornerstones of Freedom), by Linda George and Charles George. Children's Press (CT) 2000. Recommended for: Ages 9-12.

  • Civil Rights Movement, by Sanford Wexler, Julian Bond (Introduction). Facts on File, 1993. Recommended for: High school and young adults. Story of the Movement using primary source material.

  • Civil Rights Movement for Kids: A History with 21 Activities, Mary C. Turck. Chicago Review Press, 2000. Stories of the role that children played in the Movement. Includes teaching activities. Recommended for: ages 9 and over.

  • The Civil Rights Movement in America, by Elaine Landau. Children's Press, 2003. Recommended for: Ages 9-12.

  • Civil Rights Movement in America From 1865 to the Present, by Pat McKissack. Childrens Press (1987) Grades 5-9.

  • Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward Justice, by Phillip M Hoose. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2009. (Young Adult)

  • Courage to Dissent: Atlanta and the Long History of the Civil Rights Movement, by Tomiko Brown-Nagin. Oxford University Press, 2011.

  • Cracking the Wall: The Struggles of the Little Rock Nine by Eileen Lucas, Mark Anthony (Illustrator). Lerner Publishing Group, 1997. Easy reader introduction to the civil rights movement and race relations through retelling of the Little Rock story. Recommended for: Grades 1-3.

  • Crossroads at Clarksdale: The Black Freedom Struggle in the Mississippi Delta after World War II, by Françoise N. Hamlin. University of North Carolina Press, 2012.

  • Dare to Dream, by Angela Medaris & Ann Rich. Penguin Putnam, 1999. Biography of Coretta Scott King and her participation in Civil Rights Movement. Recommended for: grades 3-5.

  • Day Martin Luther King Jr. Was Shot, Photo History of Civil Rights Movement, by James Haskins. Scholastic, 1991. History of Civil Rights Movement from slavery to death of Dr. King in text and photos. Recommended for ages: 9-12.

  • Days of Courage: The Little Rock Story, by Richard Kelso, Mel Williges (Illustrator). Raintree Publishers, 1992. Story of the of the "Little Rock Nine" and the integration of Central High. in 1957. Recommended for ages: 8-12.

  • Ella Baker: A Leader Behind the Scenes, by Shyrlee Dallard. Silver Burdett, 1990. Ages 9-12

  • Eddie's Ordeal (NEATE book #4), by Kelly Starling Lyons. Just Us Books, 2004. Story of a 13-year-old young man and his civil rights veteran father who struggle to understand each other and find common ground. Recommended for ages: 8-12

  • Free At Last: A History of the Civil Rights Movement and Those Who Died in the Struggle, by Sara Bullard. Oxford University Press, 1993. History of the struggle from slavery times to the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Developed in conjunction with the "Teaching Tolerance" project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. Recommended for: Ages 9-12.

  • Freedom's Children, by Ellen Levine. William Morrow & Company, 1993. First-person accounts of 30 young Freedom Movement activists from the 50's and 60's. Recommended for: Grades 6-12.

  • Freedom on the Menu: the Greensboro Sit-Ins, by Carole Boston Weatherford and Jerome LaGarrigue (Artist). Dial, 2004. Picture book about the sit-ins from the perspective of a little girl. Recommended for: Grades 1-3.

  • Freedom Song: Young Voices and the Struggle for Civil Rights, by Mary C. Turck. Chicago Review Press, 2008. (Includes CD of freedom songs by the Chicago Children's Choir). Recommended for Grades 6-9.

  • Freedom Rides: Journey for Justice, James Haskins, Hyperion Books for Children, 1995. Recommended for ages 5 to 9.

  • Freedom Songs, by Yvette Moore. Orchard Books, 1991. Recommended for: Young Adult. Historical novel set in 1963 about the early days of the Movement. Story of a teenage Brooklyn girl who travels to the South and confronts segregation. (Teen) (May be difficult to find copies.)

  • Freedom Summer, by Deborah Wiles, Jerome Lagarrigue. Atheneum, 2001). Freedom Summer as seen through the eyes of two children, one Black, one white. Recommended for: Ages 4-8

  • Going to School During the Civil Rights Movement, by Rachel Koestler-Grack. Blue Earth Books. Daily life of children in school under segregation and the during the Movement. Recommended for: Ages 9-12.

  • Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King, by Jean Marzollo. Scholastic (big edition), 1995. For ages 3-7.

  • I Have a Dream, by Martin Luther King. Scholastic 1997. The text of the famous speech illustrated by 15 Coretta Scott King Award-winning artists. Recommended for: Ages 4-8

  • I Have a Dream (Voices of Freedom), by Karen Price Hossell. Heinemann, 2005. Recommended for ages 4-8.

  • I Have A Dream , by Jim Haskins. Millbrook Press, 1992. Biography of King, his achievements, and the Movement. Includes excepts from King's speeches, sermons, etc. Recommended for: Ages 4-8.

  • I Have a Dream: The Story Behind Martin Luther King Jr.'s Most Famous Speech (America in Words and Song), by Kerry Graves. Chelsea Clubhouse, 2004. Recommended for ages 4-8.

  • If a Bus Could Talk: The Story of Rosa Parks, by Faith Ringgold. Alladdin Paperback, 2002. The bus tells the Rosa Parks story to a young girl. Recommended for: ages 5 to 9.

  • If You Lived at the Time of Martin Luther King, by . Ellen Levine, Anna Rich, Scholastic 1994. Overview of Civil Rights Movement with art Q/A format teaching what it was like to participate in some of the historic events. Recommended for: 9-12.

  • Jim Crow Laws and Racism in American History, by David K. Fremon. Enslow Publishers, 2000. (Recommended for grades 5-9)

  • Just Like Martin, by Ossie Davis. Puffin Books, 1994. Fictional account of young boy and the Movement. Recommend for ages 10 to 14.

  • King, by Ho Che Anderson. Sagebrush Education Resources, 2002. Three volume biography of Dr. King in "comics" format. Recommended for young adult and adult.

  • Let It Shine: Stories of Black Women Freedom Fighters, by Andrea Davis Pinkney, Stephen Alcorn (Illustrator). Gulliver Books, 2000. Bios of ten heroic Black women from Sojourner Truth to Shirley Chisholm struggle for causes from abolition, to women's rights and civil rights. Grades 4-7.

  • Linda Brown, You Are Not Alone: The Brown V. Board of Education Decision, by Joyce Carol Thomas and Curtis James. Jump At The Sun, 2003. Collection of stories, memoirs, and poems about the history and impact of Brown v. Board of Education. Recommended for grades 6-12.

  • Leon's Story, by Leon Tillage and Susan Roth (illustrator). Farar, Strauss, & Giroux, 2000. Personal story told by sharecropper's son of life in the segregated south and the coming of the Movement. Recommended for ages: 8-12.

  • Marching For Freedom: Walk Together, Children, and Don't You Grow Weary, by Elizabeth Partridge. Viking, 2009. Describes the role of school children in the Selma Voting Rights Campaign and the March to Montgomery. Recommended for ages 10 and up.

  • Marching Toward Freedom 1957-1965: From the Founding of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to the Assassination of Malcom X (Milestones in Black American History) by Robert Weisbrot. Chelsea House Publications, 1994. From the lunch-counter sit-ins to the March to Montgomery, tells the story of the Movement. Recommended for: Grades 6-12.

  • The March From Selma to Montgomery: African Americans Demand the Vote, by Jake Miller. PowerKids Press, 2004. Recommended for: Ages 4-8.

  • The March on Washington, by James Haskins. Just Us Books, 2004. Recommended for ages 9-12.

  • March On Washington, 1963 (Spotlight on American History), by Tricia Andryszewski. Millbrook Press, 1996. Illustrated description of the march, the participants, and the history that led up to it. Recommended for: Ages 9-12.

  • Martin's Big Words: The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by Doreen Rappaport. Hyperion Books, 2001. Picture-story biography of Dr. King with many quotations. Recommended for: Ages 5 to 9.

  • Martin Luther King, by Rosemary Bray. Wm Morrow, 1996. Illustrated biography of Dr. King. Recommended for ages: 5 to 8.

  • Martin Luther King Jr and the March on Washington, by . Frances Ruffin, Stephen Marchesi. Grosset & Dunlap; 2000. Background & story of the march and King's speech. Recommended for: Grades 1-3.

  • Mississippi Challenge, by Mildred Pitts Walter. Simon & Schuster, 1992. Story of struggle for civil rights by Blacks in Mississippi from slavery to the Civil Rights Movement. Ages 11 - Young Adult.

  • Murder on the Highway: the Viola Liuzzo Story, by Beatrice Siegel. Simon & Schuster 1994. Ages 12 and up. Hard to find.

  • My Brother Martin: A Sister Remembers, by Christine King Farris, Chris Soentpiet (Illustrator). Simon & Schuster, 2002. Recommended for: Stories of Dr. King as a boy and young man as described by his older sister. Ages 4-8.

  • My Dream of Martin Luther King, by Faith Ringgold. Bantam, 1998. Picture book bio of Dr. King through a child's dreaming. Recommended for: ages 5 to 8

  • Nation in Turmoil, Civil Rights and the Vietnam War (1960-1973), by Gene Brown. 21st Century Books, 1995. Primary source material on Civil Rights and Anti-War movements. Recommended for: 12 and older.

  • The 1963 Civil Rights March (Landmark Events in American History), by Scott Ingram. World Almanac Library, 2004. Recommended for Ages 9-12.

  • The 1963 March on Washington: Speeches and Songs for Civil Rights, by Jake Miller. PowerKids Press, 2004. Recommended for: Ages 4-8

  • Now Is Your Time! The African-American Struggle for Freedom, by Walter Dean Myers. HarperTrophy, 1991. Uses stories and struggles of individuals to illustrate of broader historical movements. Ages 11-Young Adult.

  • Oh, Freedom! Kids Talk about the Civil Rights Movement with the People Who Made It Happen, by Casey King and Linda Barrett Osborne. Econo-Clad Books, 1997. Elementary school children interview Movement participants. Recommended for: grades 4 to 8.

  • Rosa Parks (Childhood of Famous Americans), by Kathleen Kudlinski and Meryl Henderson. Aladdin, 2001. Age Level: 8 and up.

  • A Picture Book of Martin Luther King, Jr., by David Adler, Robert Casilla (Illustrator). Holiday House, 1991. Illustrated biography of Dr. King for young readers. Recommended for: ages 4-9.

  • The Power of One: Daisy Bates and the Little Rock Nine, by Dennis Brindell Fradin, Judith Bloom Fradin. Clarion Books, 2004. Biography telling of the struggle to integrate Central High. Photographs & primary source material. Recommended for: grades 6-11.

  • Rosa Parks: From the Back of the Bus to the Front of a Movement, by Camilla Wilson. Scholastic, 2001. Story of Rosa Parks & Montgomery Bus Boycott. Recommended for: Ages 9-12

  • Rosa Parks: My Story, by Rosa Parks, James and Jim Haskins. Puffin, 1999. Rosa Park's own story of her life and struggle in the Freedom Movement. Recommended for: Ages 9 to Young Adult.

  • Remember Little Rock: The Time, the People, the Stories, by Paul Robert Walker. National Geographic Children's Books, 2009. Ages 9-12

  • Selma, Lord, Selma, Sheyann Webb and Rachel West Nelson. University of Alabama Press, 1980. Memoir of Selma's "youngest freedom fighters," Sheyann 8 and Rachel 9.

  • Sit-Ins and Freedom Rides: The Power of Nonviolent Resistance, by Jake Miller. PowerKids Press, 2004. Large-print, easy-to-read book with photo illustrations. Covers Montgomery Bus Boycott, Greensboro Sit-ins, and Freedom Rides. Recommended for: Grades 2-4.

  • Stand up For Your Rights, by Children from all over the World. Two-Can Publishers, 2000. Children from many countries describe in their own words and pictures the importance to them of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Grade 9- 12.

  • Story of Ruby Bridges, by Robert Coles. Scholastic, 1995. Illustrated story of 6 year old Ruby Bridges, the first African- American child to integrate the New Orleans schools system in defiance of racist attackers. Recommended for: Grades 1-3.

  • They Had a Dream: The Civil Rights Struggle from Frederick Douglass to Marcus Garvey to Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, by Jules Archer. Viking Books, 1993. Ages 10- Young Adult.

  • There Comes a Time: The Struggle for Civil Rights, by Milton Meltzer. Random House, 2002. Overview of struggle for equality by American Blacks from slavery time to curret day. Ages 10-Young Adult.

  • Through Angel's Eyes, by Steve Theunissen. Strategic Book Publishing, 2012. Novelization of the Birmingham campaign ("Childrens Crusade") through the eyes of a 13 year old African American girl. For Young Adults.

  • Through My Eyes, by Ruby Bridges, Margo Lundell. Scholastic, Inc. 1999. Story of (and by) Ruby Bridges who at age 6 was the first Black child to integrate a public school in New Orleans. Recommended for: ages 8-11.

  • We Shall Overcome: Heroes of the Civil Rights Movement, by Fred Powledge Simon & Schuster, 1993. (Young Adult)

  • We Shall Overcome: The History of the American Civil Rights Movement, by Reggie Finlayson. Lerner Publishing Group, 2002. Uses freedom song lyrics and speeches to structure the history and show the emotional power that underlay the Movement. Grades 5-10.

  • Witnesses to Freedom, Young People Who Fought for Civil Rights, by Belinda Rochelle. Dutton, 1993. Stories of young people who made a difference, Central High in Little Rock, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Sit-ins, etc. Recommended for grades: 5-8.

General Audiences

Available in Bookstores, through Libraries, or online.

  • Aaron Henry: The Fire Ever Burning, by Aaron Henry, Constance Curry. University Press of Mississippi, 2000. Personal story and narrative of Mississippi Movement leader Aaron Henry who fought the hard fight in the deep Delta, was jailed more than 30 times, and was a leader in the formation of COFO and the MFDP.

  • A Breath of Freedom: The Civil Rights Struggle, African American GIs, and Germany, by Maria Hvhn and Martin Klimke. Palgrave MacMillan, 2010

  • A Circle of Trust: Remembering SNCC, by Cheryl Lynn Greenberg (Editor). Rutgers University Press, 1998. On the occasion of the SNCC's 25th anniversary, activists and historians reflect together on the civil rights movement and its meanings and on SNCC's place in American history.

  • Africana: Civil Rights, by Kwame Anthony Appiah, Henry Louis Gates. Running Press Book Publishers. Overview, history, and background of the civil rights movement.

  • African American Religion and the Civil Rights Movement in Arkansas, by Johnny E. Williams. University of Mississippi Press.

  • Along Racial Lines: Consequences of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, by David M. Hudson. Peter Lang Publishing, 1998. History, background, & interpretations of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and its amendments.

  • American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass, by Douglas Massey, Nancy Denton. Harvard University Press, 1994.

  • American Civil Rights Movement Readings and Interpretations, by Raymond D'Angelo, McGraw-Hill, 2001. Extensive collection of primary and secondary documents of the American Civil Rights movement.

  • The American Negro Revolution: From Nonviolence to Black Power, 1963-1967. , by Benjamin Muse. Indiana University Press, 1968. RARE.

  • American Nightmare: The History of Jim Crow, by Jerrold M. Packard. St. Martin's Press, 2001.

  • An Act of Conscience, by Len Holt. Beacon Press (1965). First-hand account of the 1963 Danville VA movement and the savage repression against it by civil rights attorney and activist Len Holt. RARE.

  • An Act of State: The Execution of Martin Luther King, by William F. Pepper. Verso, 2002. Argues that King's assassination was a plot involving the highest levels of government, the military, state and federal law enforcement and organized crime. The author knew MLK and was one of James Earl Ray's defense attorneys.

  • An American Insurrection: James Meredith and the Battle of Oxford, Mississippi, 1962, by William Doyle. Anchor, 2003. Story of the bloody battle to integrate University of Mississippi ("Ole Miss").

  • And Gently Shall He Lead Them: Robert Parris Moses and Civil Rights in Mississippi, by Eric Burner. University Press, 1994. History of Movement in MS, focusing on Bob Moses.

  • And the Walls Came Tumbling Down An Autobiography, by Ralph David Abernathy. Harper & Row, 1989. RARE.

  • Arsnick: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Arkansas, edited by Jennifer Jensen Wallach and John A. Kirk. University of Arkansas Press, 2011. Collection of articles, firsthand testimonies, and historical documents that chronicle the history of SNCC's Arkansas Project from 1962 to 1967.

  • At Canaan's Edge — America in the King Years 1965-68, by Taylor Branch. Simon & Schuster, 2006. Volume Three of Pulitzer Prize winning history of the Movement. Including the Selma Voting Rights Campaign, the March to Montgomery, Black Power, the Meredith March, Chicago Campaign, anti-Vietnam War, and more. See also Parting the Waters and Pillar of Fire.

  • At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape, and Resistance--A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power, by Danielle L. McGuire. Knopf, 2010. Examines racial sexual violence and exploiration in the context of racial injustice and the Civil Rights Movement's fight for freedom.

  • Atlanta Georgia, 1960-1961: Sit Ins and Student Activism (Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Civil Rights Movement, Vol 9), by David J. Garrow (Editor). Carlson Pub, 1989. RARE.

  • At the Funeral of Medgar Evers in Jackson, Mississippi, by James E. Jackson. Publisher's New Press, 1963. "A tribute in tears and a thrust for freedom." RARE.

  • Autobiography of a Freedom Rider: My Life as a Foot Soldier for Civil Rights, by Thomas Armstrong and Natalie Bell. HCI, 2011. The story of a freedom foot soldier, a son of the Jim Crow South, and his struggle to restore rights of citizenship that have been taken from his ancestors.

  • At the River I Stand: Memphis, the 1968 Sanitation Strike and Martin Luther King, Jr., by Joan Turner Beifuss. Saint Luke's Press, 1990. RARE.

  • The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, by Martin Luther King, Clayborne Carson (editor). Warner Books, 2000. Postumous autobiography compiled from Dr. King's writings and papers by Carson.

  • The Autobiography of Medgar Evers: A Hero's Life and Legacy Revealed Through His Writings, Letters, and Speeches, by Myrlie Evers-Williams (Editor), Manning Marable (Editor). Basic Civitas Books, 2005.

  • A Walk to Freedom: The Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, 1956-1964, by Marjorie L. White. Birmingham Historical Society, 1998. Narrative, recollections, photos, and newspaper stories about ACMHR & Rev. Shuttlesworth. RARE.

  • Backfire: How the Ku Klux Klan Helped the Civil Rights Movement, by David Chalmers. Rowman & Littlefield, 2003. Profiles KKK history and terrorism of past 50 years, the legal attack against the Klan by the Southern Poverty Law Center, and eventual decline of the Klan, and the new white-supremacist groups now replacing the Klan.

  • Barefootin': Life Lessons from the Road to Freedom, by Unita Blackwell & Joanne Prichard Morris. Crown, 2006. Autobiography of Mississippi Movement leader Unita Blackwell who in 1964 "Went from cotton picker to full-time freedom fighter." HARD TO FIND.

  • The Battle of Ole Miss: Civil Rights v. States' Rights, by Frank Lambert. Oxford University Press, 2010.

  • Battling the Plantation Mentality: Memphis and the Black Freedom Struggle, by Laurie Green. Univ. of North Carolina Press, 2007.

  • Bayard Rustin and the Civil Rights Movement, by Daniel Levine. Rutgers University Press, 1999. Scholarly biography covering Rustin's public & private persona in light of his struggles as a gay Black man as an activist.

  • Bayard Rustin: Behind the Scenes of the Civil Rights Movement, by James Haskins. Biography of Bayard Rustin and his key role in the Movement.

  • Bayard Rustin: Troubles I've Seen: A Biography, by Jervis Anderson. University of California Press, 1998. RARE.

  • Beneath the Image of the Civil Rights Movement and Race Relations: Atlanta, GA 1946-1981, by Paul Finkelman, David A. Harmon. Taylor & Francis, Inc. 1996. Civil Rights Atlanta from end of WWII to 1980. Contrasts the image Atlanta tried to project with the underlying realities. RARE.

  • Beyond Atlanta: The Struggle for Racial Equality in Georgia, 1940-1980, by Stephen G. N. Tuck. University of Georgia Press, 2003.

  • Beyond the Burning Bus: The Civil Rights Revolution in a Southern Town, by Phil Noble. NewSouth 2003. First-hand account of desegregation and civil rights in Anniston, Alabama.

  • Beaches, Blood, and Ballots, A Black Doctor's Civil Rights Struggle, Gilbert R. Mason, M.D., with James Patterson Smith. University Press of Mississippi, 2000. A frontline memoir from the Biloxi physician who fought to bring civil rights justice to the Mississippi Gulf Coast.

  • Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, & Southern Christian Leadership Conference, David Garrow. William Morris, 1986. Extensively researched biography of Dr. King and history of SCLC.

  • Before His Time: The Untold Story Of Harry T. Moore, America's First Civil Rights Martyr, by Ben Green. University Press of Florida, 2005. Story of Florida NAACP leader and his wife who led successful voter-registration campaigns and were assasinated by racists in 1951.

  • Behind the Dream: The Making of the Speech that Transformed a Nation, by Clarence B. Jones & Stuart Connelly. Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. Story of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" as told by one of Dr. King's closest companions and advisors.

  • Better Day Coming: Blacks and Equality, 1890- 2000, by Adam Fairclough. Penguin, 2002. Overview of struggle by Black Americans to achieve civil rights and equality after the collapse of Reconstruction.

  • A Bill Becomes a Law: Congress Enacts Civil Rights Legislation, by Daniel M. Berman. MacMillan, 1966. RARE.

  • Birmingham's Revolutionaries: Fred Shuttlesworth ACMHR, by Marjorie L. White and Andrew M. Manis, editors. Mercer University Press. Analysis, research papers, & essays from Birmingham Historical Society symposium.

  • Black In Selma: The Uncommon Life of J. L. Chestnut, by J. L. Chestnut & Julia Cass. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1999. Biography of Selma Movement leader J. L. Chestnut.

  • Black Maverick: T. R. M. Howard's Fight for Civil Rights and Economic Power, by David Beito, Linda Royster Beito. University of Illinois Press, 2009. Biography describing Howard's life and struggles in Mississippi and elsewhere.

  • Black Parties and Political Power: A Case Study, by Hardy T Frye. G. K. Hall (1980) RARE

  • Black Power, by Richard Wright. Dobson (1956). RARE.

  • Black Power and the American Myth, by C. T Vivian. Fortress Press, 1970. RARE.

  • Black Power Ideologies: An Essay in African-American Political Thought, by John T. McCartney. Temple University Press, 1993 (Reissue).

  • Black Power Imperative: Racial Inequality and the Politics of Nonviolence, by Theodore Cross. Faulkner Books, 1987. RARE.

  • Black Power: The Politics of Liberation (in America), by Charles Hamilton, Kwame Ture (Stokely Carmichael). Vintage, 1992 (Reissue).

  • Black Power: Radical Politics and African American Identity, by Jeffrey O. G. Ogbar. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005. Part of Reconfiguring American Political History series.

  • The Black Power Revolt, by Floyd B. Barbour (editor). Porter Sargent Publishers, 1968. RARE.

  • Black Protest: 350 Years of History, Documents, and Analyses, by Joanne Grant. Ballantine Books, 1996. Documentary history by Movement activist Joanne Grant of three and one half centuries of Black-American protest and agitation.

  • Black Protest in the Sixties, by August Meier, John Bracey Jr, Elliott Rudwick eds. Markus Wiener Publishing, 1991. RARE.

  • Black Religious Intellectuals: The Fight for Equality from Jim Crow to the 21st Century, by Clarence Taylor. Routledge, 2002.

  • Black Theology and Black Power, by James H. Cone. Orbis Books, 1997 (Reprint).

  • Black, White, and Catholic New Orleans Interracialism, 1947-1956, by Bentley Anderson , S.J. Vanderbuilt University Press, 2005. Story of integration of Catholic schools and orders in city of New Orleans.

  • Black Workers' Struggle for Equality in Birmingham, by Horace Huntley, David Montgomery, and Odessa Woolfolk. University of Illinois Press, 2004. Annotated interviews of participants in the Civil Rights Movement collected by the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute.

  • Blood and Bone: Truth and Reconciliation in a Southern Town, by Jack Shuler. University of South Carolina Press, 2012. Account of the Orangeburg Massacre of 1968 and its aftermath.

  • Bloody Lowndes: Civil Rights and Black Power in Alabama's Black Belt, by Hasan Jeffries. NYU Press, 2009. Story of SNCC organizing in Lowndes County, the Lowndes County Freedom Organization (LCFO), and the emergence of Black Power.

  • A Blues Song of My Own, by Joyce Russell Terrell. CASI Publishing, 2009. Written by a young woman who integrated an all-white high school in Prince William County, tells the story of the Russell family's struggle for justice. Hard to find, but can be ordered from www.casipublishing.com, or by mail from:
         CASI Publishing
         Craig Harston
         PO Box 442
         Signal Mountain, TN 37377

  • Breach of Peace: Portraits of the 1961 Mississippi Freedom Riders, by Eric Etheridge. Atlas & Co., 2008. Original mug shots along with personal histories and interviews of Freedom Riders arrested in Jackson MS. See Breach of Peace for more info.

  • Bridge Across Jordan: The Story of the Struggle for Civil Rights in Selma, by Amelia Boynton. Carlton Press, 1979. First-hand account of the Selma Movement by Movement leader Amelia Boynton. RARE.

  • Bridge of the Single Hair, by Candida Lall Pugh. Langdon Street Press, 2011. Fictional account of Freedom Ride based on author's personal experience.

  • Bridging the Gap: Continuing the Florida NAACP Legacy of Harry T. Moore, by Robert W. Saunders. University of Tampa Press, 2000.

  • Brown v Board of Education: Caste, Culture, and the Constitution, (Landmark Law Cases and American Society), by Robert J. Cottrol, Raymond T. Diamond, Leland B. Ware, Leland Ware. University Press of Kansas, 2003. Explores both the history and cultural context of the Brown decision. Highlights the role of the NAACP.

  • Brown v. Board of Education: A Civil Rights Milestone and Its Troubled Legacy, by James T. Patterson. Oxford University Press, 2002.

  • Brown's Battleground: Students, Segregationists, and the Struggle for Justice in Prince Edward County, Virginia, by Jill Ogline Titus. University of North Carolina Press, 2011.

  • Bus Ride to Justice: Changing the System by the System: The Life and Works of Fred D. Gray, by Fred Gray, River City Publications, 1994. Autobiography of Alabama Movement Preacher, Attorney, Politician, Legislator. Lawyer for Rosa Parks, Dr. King, Selma to Montgomery March, and victims of the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (1932-1972). RARE.

  • But for Birmingham: The Local and National Movements in the Civil Rights Struggle, by Glenn T. Eskew. University of North Carolina Press, 1996. Detailed historical examination of Birmingham struggle in 1950s and 1960s.

  • A Call to Conscience: The Landmark Speeches of Dr. Martin Luther King, by Kris Shepard, Andrew Young, Clayborne Carson. Warner Books, 2002.

  • Call to Selma, by Rev. Richard D. Leonard. Skinner House Books, 2001. First-hand account of the crises in Selma as experienced by one of the "outside" ministers who came to Selma to witness for justice after the attack on the Edmund Pettus bridge. RARE.

  • Carry It On: the War on Poverty and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, by Susan Youngblood Ashmore. University of Georgia Press, 2008.

  • Carry Me Home: Birmingham Alabama, Climactic Battle of the Civil Rights Revolution, by Diane McWhorter. Simon & Schuster, 2001. Sympathetic history of the Birmingham struggle of 1963 from the white side of the color line.

  • A Case of Black and White: Northern Volunteers and the Southern Freedom Summers, by Mary Rothschild. Bloomberg Press, 1982. RARE.

  • Centers of the Southern Struggle: FBI Files on Selma, Memphis, Montgomery, Albany, and St. Augustine, by David J. Garrow, Martin P. Schipper, Michael Moscato. University Publications of America, 1988. RARE

  • Challenging the Mississippi Firebombers: Memories of Mississippi 1964-65, by Jim Dann. Baraka Books, 2013.
    Personal account of a Civil Rights Worker's 15 months in Sunflower Couty MS 1964-65.

  • Challenging U.S. Apartheid: Atlanta and Black Struggles for Human Rights, 1960-1977, by Winston A. Grady-Willis, Duke University Press, 2006.

  • The Children, by David Halberstam. Fawcett Book Group, 1999. The early days of the Movement, Nashville sit-ins, Freedom Rides, and the lives of key activists since then.

  • The Children Bob Moses Led (Novel), by William Heath. Milkweed Editions, 1997. Fictionalized account of Freedom Summer.

  • The Children Coming On : A Retrospective of the Montgomery Bus Boycott, by Willy S. Levanthal. Black Belt Press, 1998. RARE

  • Children of the Movement, by John Blake. Lawrence Hill Books, 2004. The Sons and Daughters of Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad, George Wallace, Andrew Young, Julian Bond, Stokely Carmichael, Bob Moses, James Chaney, Elaine Brown, and others reveal how the Civil Rights Movement tested and transformed their families.

  • Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, N.C. and the Sruggle for Freedom, by William Henry Chafe. Oxford University Press, 1990. Story of the Movement in Greensboro beginning with the first sit-in and continues up through the 1980s.

  • Civil Rights: The 1960s Freedom Struggle, by Rhoda Blumberg. Macmillan, 1991. Overview of the Movement. RARE.

  • Civil Rights Childhood, by Jordana Y. Shakoor. University Press of Mississippi, 1999. Memoir of the Movement era by the daughter of Mississippi NAACP leader and teacher Andrew L. Jordan.

  • Civil Rights Chronicle (The African-American Struggle for Freedom), by Clayborne Carson (Foreword), Myrlie Evers-Williams (Editor), Mark Bauerlein (Editor), Todd Steven Burroughs, Ella Forbes, and Jim Haskins. Publications International, 2003. Photo-essay, coffee-table sized book convering the Civil Rights Movement, from slavery to the present day.

  • Civil Rights Chronicle: Letters from the South, by Clarice Campbell. University Press of Mississippi, 1997. Letters from school teacher studying & teaching in deep south during the Movement years.

  • Civil Rights Crossroads: Nation, Community, and the Black Freedom Struggle, by Steven Lawson. Univ. Kentucky Press, 2003.

  • Civil Rights History From the Ground Up: Local Struggles, a National Movement, by Emilye Crosby (Ed). University of Georgia Press, 2011.

  • The Civil Rights Movement (Seminar Studies in History), by Bruce J. Dierenfield. Longman, 2004.

  • The Civil Rights Movement in American Memory, by Renee Christine Romano (Editor), Leigh Raiford (Editor). University of Georgia Press, 2006.

  • Civil Rights Movement: A Photographic History 1954-68, by Steven Kasher. Abbeville Press, 2000. Movement photo collection with text by Movement participants. Forward by Myrlie Evers-Williams.

  • Civil Rights Movement: People and Perspectives, by Michael Ezra. ABC-CLIO, 2009.

  • Civil Rights Movement: References & Resources, by Paul Murray. Macmillan Reference, 1993. Bibliography and annotated literature review of the Movement. RARE.

  • The Civil Rights Movement in Tennessee: A Narrative History, by Bobby L. Lovett. Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2005

  • Civil Rights, the White House, and the Justice Department: Securing the Enactment of Civil Rights Legislation, by Michal R. Belknap (Editor). Garland Publishing, 1991.RARE.

  • Civil War on Race Street: The Civil Rights Movement in Cambridge Maryland, by Peter Levy. University Press of Florida, 2003. Detailed history and analyses of the Cambridge movement.

  • The Civil Rights Movement and the Logic of Social Change, by Joseph E. Luders. Cambridge University Press, 2010. (Cambridge Studies in Contentious Politics)

  • The Civil Rights Revolution: Events and Leaders, 1955-1968, by Frederic O. Sargent. McFarland & Company, 2004

  • Class, Race, and the Civil Rights Movement (Blacks in the Diaspora), by Jack M. Bloom. Indiana University Press, 1987. Scholarly examination of the class roots and aspects of the white racist system in the South, and the interaction of race and class within and on the Movement. A sophisticated study, recommended primarily for specialists in the field.

  • Climbin' Jacob's Ladder: The Black Freedom Movement Writings of Jack O'Dell, by Jack O'Dell. University of California Press. January 2010. Anthology of Movement-related writings by a central — though unsung — Freedom Movement activist and editor of Freedomways magazine.

  • Code name "Zorro": The murder of Martin Luther King, by Mark Lane. Prentice-Hall, 1977. Aruges that there was a conspiracy behind Dr. King's assasination. RARE.

  • The COINTELPRO Papers: Documents from the FBI's Secret Wars Against Dissent in the United States, by Ward Churchill, Jim Vander Wall. South End Press, 2001. Includes much material on the FBI's persecution and sabotage of the Movement.

  • The Cold War and the Color Line: American Race Relations in the Global Arena, by Thomas Borstelmann. Harvard University Press, 2003. Examination of how the Cold War intersected with the final destruction of global white supremacy with focus on the two Souths — Southern Africa and the American South.

  • Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy, by Mary L. Dudziak. Princeton University Press, 2002. Analyzes impact of Cold War foreign affairs on U.S. civil rights reform and how international relations affected domestic issues. Interprets Civil Rights Movement as a Cold War feature and argues that the Cold War helped facilitate social reforms, including desegregation.

  • Coming of Age in Mississippi, by Anne Moody. Dell Publishing, 1975. Powerful story in her own words of a Mississippi civil rights activist.

  • The Coming Free, by David Rubel. DK Publishing Group (Penguin), 2005. Chronicle of history of Black freedom struggles with many photos.

  • Compromised Compliance: Implementation of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, by Howard Ball, Dale Krane, Thomas P. Laut. Greenwood Press; Reprint edition, 1982

  • Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Martin Luther King's Murder, by William Pepper. Harper Collins, 1996. Argues that James Earl Ray was a fall guy, and that King was murdered by a conspiracy involving the FBI, CIA, Army intelligence, the mafia, and the Memphis police force. Pepper was chief counsel for James Earl Ray in Ray's appeal of his conviction.

  • Controversy and Hope: The Civil Rights Photographs of James Karales, by Julian Cox, Rebekah Jacob, Monica Karales. University of South Carolina Press, 2013.

  • CORE: A Study in the Civil Rights Movement 1942-1968, August Meier and Elliot Rudwick, Oxford Univ Press, 1973. RARE.

  • Count Them One by One: Black Mississippians Fighting for the Right to Vote, by Gordon A. Martin. University Press of Mississippi, 2010.

  • Cradle of Freedom: Alabama and the Movement That Changed America, by Frye Gaillard, University of Alabama Press, 2004. The Civil Rights Movement in Alabama.

  • Crisis at Central High, Little Rock, 1957- 58 by Elizabeth Huckaby. Louisiana State University Press, 1980

  • Crossing Border Street: A Civil Rights Memoir, by Peter Jan Honigsberg. University of California Press, 2002. Personal memoir of the Movement in Bogalusa and Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, and the Deacons for Defense and Justice.

  • Daybreak of Freedom, by Stewart Burns. University of North Carolina, 1997. A history of the boycott that includes original documents, court transcripts, news articles, and other materials.

  • The Deacons for Defense and Justice: Defenders of the African American Community in Bogalusa, Louisiana During the 1960's, by Gray L. LaSimba. Four-G Publishers, 2000. Rare and hard to find.

  • Deacons for Defense: Armed Resistance and the Civil Rights Movement, by Lance Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 2004. History of the Deacons' civil rights activity and organizing in Louisiana and elsewhere.

  • Debating the Civil Rights Movement: 1945-1968, by Steven Lawson & Charles Payne. Roman & Littlefield, 1998. Two scholars examine the individuals and events of the movement.

  • Deep in Our Hearts, Nine White Women in the Freedom Movement, University of Georgia Press, 2000. First-person memoirs of the Southern Freedom Movement.

  • Defying Dixie: The Radical Roots of Civil Rights, 1919-1950, by Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore. W. W. Norton, 2008. Account of social justice movements and campaigns in the South before the advent of the Freedom Movement of the 1960s.

  • The Devil Has Slippery Shoes; a Biased Biography of the Child Development Group of Mississippi, by Polly Greenberg. 1969.

  • Die Nigger Die!: A Political Autobiography of Jamil Abdullah al-Amin, by H. Rap Brown (Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin). Lawrence Hill Books, 2002. Autobiography and political statement of SNCC Chairman and Black Power advocate.

  • Dispossession: Discrimination Against African American Farmers in the Age of Civil Rights, by Pete Daniel. Univ. of North Carolina Pres, 2013.

  • Divided Minds: Intellectuals and the Civil Rights Movement, by Carol Posgrove. Norton, 2001. Critical examination exposing the timid lack of support for the Movement on the part of American intellectual elites.

  • Divine Agitators: The Delta Ministry and Civil Rights in Mississippi, by Mark Newman. University of Georgia Press, 2003. Initiated by the National Council of Churches, the Delta Ministry eventually became one of the largest and most active Movement organizations in Mississippi.

  • Documentary History of the Modern Civil Rights Movement, by Peter Levy. Greenwood Press, 1992. RARE.

  • Down Home, Camden, Alabama, by Bob Adelman. Quadrangle, 1974. Photo book about Gees Bend and Wilcox County at the time of the Freedom Movement. HARD TO FIND.

  • Down to the Crossroads: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Meredith March Against Fear, by Aram Goudsouzian. Farrar Straus & Giroux. 2014.

  • A Dream of Freedom: The Civil Rights Movement From 1954 to 1968, by Diane McWhorter. Scholastic, 2004.

  • Dream: Martin Luther King, JR. and the Speech That Inspired a Nation, by Drew D. Hansen. HarperCollins, 2003. Story of the events leading up to Dr. King's speech to the March on Washington in 1963, its effect, and how its meaning has affected the nation.

  • Echo in My Soul, Septima Clark. Dutton, 1962. Autobiography of dedicated civil rights activist and "Citizenship School" founder. RARE.

  • The Education of a Black Radical: A Southern Civil Rights Activist's Journey, 1959 — 1964, by D'Army Bailey. LSU Press, 2009.

  • Education of a Harvard Guy: Footsoldier in the Civil Rights Movement, by John Perdew. GrantHouse Publishers, 2010. Personal story of a SNCC veteran's three year sojourn in Albany, Americus, and SW Georgia Freedom Movements from 1963 to 1966.

  • Education of a Harvard Guy [play], by Dr. Curtis Williams. Dramatic play based on John Perdew's memoirs of the Freedom Movement in Americus and Albany, Georgia, 1963-66 (see above).

  • An Easy Burden: the Civil Rights Movement and the Transformation of America, by Andrew Young. Harper Collins, 1996. First person account of an SCLC leader.

  • Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision, by Barbara Ransby. North Carolina Press, 2003. Biography of the Movement leader (NAACP, SCLC, and SNCC).

  • Ella Baker: Freedom Bound, by Joanne Grant. John Wiley & Sons. 1998. Account of Ella Baker and her central role in the Movement.

  • Ella Baker and the SNCC: Grassroots Leadership and Political Activism in a Nonhierarchical Organization, by Joan Charles. (VDM Verlag, 2009.

  • Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey into Mississippi's Dark Past: A Memoir, by W. Ralph Eubanks. Basic Books, 2003. Memoir of growing up in Mount Olive, Mississippi, in the 1960s.

  • An Eyewitness History of the Civil Rights Movement, by Sanford Wexler. Facts on File, 1999. First hand accounts of the Movement.

  • Eyes off the Prize: The United Nations and the African-American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955, by Carol Anderson. Cambridge University Press, 2003. Describes effort to use the U.N. in the fight against segregation and inequality in the U.S. in period before Montgomery Bus Boycott, and analyzes the difference between struggling for human rights versus concentrating solely on civil rights.

  • Eyes on the Prize, Juan Williams. Viking, 1987. Companion volume to the PBS TV series of the same name documenting the Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965.

  • Eyes on the Prize, Documents, Speeches, and First Hand Accounts from the Black Freedom Struggle. Viking Penguin, 1991. Large compilation of primary source material Edited by Clayborne Carson, David Garrow, Darlene Hine, Vincent Harding, and Gerald Gill.

  • Everybody Says Freedom, Pete Seeger & Bob Reiser. Norton, 1989. History of the Civil Rights Movement in songs, pictures, and interviews.

  • Faces of Freedom Summer The Photographs of Herbert Randall. Compiled by Bobs Tusa. University of Alabama Press, 2001. Photo collection from Freedom Summer 1964.

  • Fannie Lou Hamer: From Sharecropping to Politics, by David Rubel. Silver Burdett, 1990. RARE.

  • Farewell to Innocence: A Socio-Ethical Study on Black Theology and Black Power, by Allan Aubrey Boesak. Orbis Books, 1977. RARE.

  • The FBI and Martin Luther King Jr., by David Garrow. Viking Penguin, 1983. Documents Hoover's racist obsession and persecution of Dr. King and the Movement. RARE.

  • Fear Not the Fall, by Billie Jean Young. New South, 2004. Poetry collection and play about Fannie Lou Hamer about the tradition of struggle, resistance, and survival common to generations of women descended from African slaves.

  • The Fight for Freedom; A Memoir of My Years in the Civil Rights Movement, by John Reynolds. AuthorHouse, 2012. Personal history of an SCLC field organizer.

  • Fifty-Eight Lonely Men: Southern Federal Judges and School Desegregation, by Jack Walter Peltason. University of Illinois Press, 1971.

  • Fight Against Fear: Southern Jews and Black Civil Rights, by Clive Webb. University of Georgia Press, 2001. Scholaraly analysis of the reaction to by Southern Jews to the Civil Rights Movement and the roles they played in it.

  • Fighting the Devil in Dixie: How Civil Rights Activists Took on the Ku Klux Klan in Alabama, by Wayne Greenhaw. Lawrence Hill Books, 2011.

  • Finding Freedom: Memorializing the Voice of Freedom Summer, by Jacqueline Johnson, editor. Miami University Press, 2013. Focused on the two trainings for Freedom Summer volunteers held at Western College for Women.

  • A Fire You Can't Put Out: The Civil Rights Life of Birmingham's Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, by Andrew Michael Manis. University of Alabama Press, 1999. Biography of the Birmingham Movement leader.

  • The Fog Machine, by Susan Follett. Lucky Sky Press, 2014. Novel set during Freedom Summer in Mississippi.

  • For Freedom's Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer, by Chana Kai Lee. University of Illinois Press, 2000. Thorough, issue- oriented, biorgraphy.

  • For a Voice and the Vote, My Journey With the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, by Lisa Anderson Todd. University Press of Kentucky, 2014.

  • For Us the Living, by Myrlie Evers and William Peters. Doubleday, 1967. Story of Medgar Evers fight for justice as seen by his wife Myrlie. (Later made into the movie For Us the Living.) RARE.

  • Free At Last? The Civil Rights Movement and the People Who Made It, by Fred Powledge. Movement history by a journalist who covered the story for the Atlanta Journal and New York Times. RARE.

  • Freedom Bound: History of the American Civil Rights Movement, by Robert Weisbrot. Dutton/Plume, 1991.

  • Freedom Colonies: Independent Black Texans in the Time of Jim Crow, by Thad Sitton, James H. Conrad, Richard Orton. University of Texas Press, 2005.

  • Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights, by Tananarive and Patricia Stephens Due. One World/Ballantine, 2003. The Freedom Movement in Florida as lived by a Freedom Family — CORE activist Patricia, Movement attorney John, and FAMU student activist (and later novelist) Tananarive Due.

  • Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: An Anthology of the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement,. By Susan Erenrich. Black Belt Press, 1999. Large compilation of valuable original source material on Civil Rights Movement.

  • Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement and Its Legacy, by Kenneth T. Andrews. University of Chicago Press, 2004. Scholarly examination of the Movement in Mississippi and its impact, social, and political legacy.

  • Freedom is Never Free: Biographical Portrait of E. D. Nixon, by Lewis Baldwin, Office of Minority Affairs, Tennessee General Assembly (1992) RARE.

  • Freedom Is Not Free, 45 Days in the Leesburg Stockade..., by LuLu Westbrooks Griffin. Heirloom Publishing, 1998. Story of one of the girls held without trial in the Leesburg GA stockade for protesting in Americus GA in 1963. RARE and hard to find.

  • Freedom & Justice: Four Decades of the Civil Rights Struggle As Seen by a Black Photographer of the Deep South, by Cecil J. Williams. Mercer University Press, 1995. Photo essay on Southern segregation and the Freedom Movement. Strong photos and first-person narrative. Author's website: Moments of Grace.

  • Freedom's March: Photographs of the Civil Rights Movement in Savannah, Frederick C. Baldwin and Telfair Museum of Art. University of Georgia Press, 2008.

  • The Freedom Rides and Alabama: A Guide to Key Events and Places, Context, and Impact, by Noelle Matteson. NewSouth Books, 2011.

  • Freedom Rider Diary: Smuggled Notes From Parchman Prison, by Carol Ruth Silver. University Press of Mississippi, 2014.

  • Freedom's Teacher: The Life of Septima Clark, by Katherine Mellen Charron. University of North Carolina Press, 2009. Biography of one of the great un-sung heroines of the Freedom Movement.

  • Freedom North: Black Freedom Struggles Outside the South, 1940-1980, by Jeanne Theoharis and Komozi Woodard (Editors). Macmillan, 2003. Examines the Black social and civil rights movements outside the South and the place of race in recent history.

  • Freedom on the Border: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky, by Catherine Fosl and Tracy E. K'Meyer. The University Press of Kentucky, 2009. (Kentucky Remembered: An Oral History Series)

  • Freedom on the Menu: The Greensboro Sit-Ins, by Jerome Lagarrigue. Puffin, 2007.

  • Freedom Ride, James Peck. Grove Press, 1962. First hand account of the original Freedom Rides by a CORE activist. RARE.

  • Freedom Riders: 1961 and the Struggle for Racial Justice, by Raymond Arsenault. Oxford University Press, USA 2006. Get on the Bus! Freedom Riders. Detailed and powerful history of the Freedom Rides and riders.

  • Freedom Song, Mary King. William Morris, 1987. Personal story of SNCC activist Mary King.

  • Freedom Summer, Sally Belfrage. Viking Press, 1965. First-hand, personal account of the 1964 Freedom Summer in Mississippi. RARE.

  • Freedom Summer, Doug McAdam. Oxford Press, 1968. Analysis of the 1964 Freedom Summer in Mississippi. RARE.

  • Freedom Summer: The Savage Season That Made Mississippi Burn and Made America a Democracy, by Bruce Watson. Viking, 2010. Describes the overall Freedom Movement in Mississippi, history of the Mississippi Summer Project, and includes personal stories of more than 50 participants.

  • Freedom's Sword: The NAACP and the Struggle Against Racism in America, 1909-1969, by Gilbert Jonas. Taylor & Francis, Inc. 2004. The first sixty years of the NAACP by an author who worked with the NAACP for more than 50 years.

  • Freedom Walk: Mississippi or Bust, by Mary Stanton. University Press of Mississippi, 2003. Story of slain Civil Rights Movement martyr Bill Moore and his Freedom Walk.

  • Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement 1830-1970, by Lynne Olson. Scribner, 2001. History of women's participation in the movement.

  • The Free Men, by John Ehle. Press 53 (reissue, 2007). 1963 Chapel Hill, NC, protests.

  • The Free Southern Theater: A Documentary of the South's Radical Black Theater, ..., by Thomas C. Dent and Richard Schechner. Bobbs-Merrill, 1969. RARE

  • Freshwater Road, by Denise Nicholas. Agate, 2005. Novel depicting a Freedom Summer volunteer in Mississippi 1964. The author herself participated in Freedom Summer as part of the Free Southern Theatre.

  • From Civil Rights to Human Rights: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Struggle for Economic Justice, by Thomas F. Jackson. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006. Explores Dr. King's political evolution, his increasing radicalization, and understanding that poverty and racism are fundamentally problems of power, requiring massive political mobilization on behalf of economic as well as civil rights.

  • From Jim Crow to Civil Rights: The Supreme Court and the Struggle for Racial Equality, by Michael J. Klarman. Oxford University Pressm, 2003. Account of constitutional law concerning race and how, and whether, Supreme Court decisions matter.

  • From the Mississippi Delta, by Endesha Mae Holland. Simon and Schuster, 1997. Hard to Find. Autobiography of SNCC member and freedom fighter.

  • From Selma to Sorrow: Life & Death of Viola Luizzo, by Mary Stanton. Univ. Georgia Press, 2000. Biography of the Civil Rights worker who was murdered by the KKK during the Selma to Montgomery march. She is the only white woman honored at the Civil Rights Memorial at Montgomery AL.

  • From Sit-ins to SNCC: The Student Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, by Iwan Morgan and Philip Davies (editors). University Press of Florida, 2012.

  • From Southern Wrongs to Civil Rights: The Memoir of White Civil Rights Activist, by Sara Parsons. University of Alabama Press, May 2000. Story of a Southern woman's political journey.

  • Gender in the Civil Rights Movement (Crosscurrents in African American History), by Peter Ling and Sharon Monteith. Garland Publishing, 1999. Anthology of essays by scholars examining the interaction between gender and race within the Movement and its legacy.

  • Ghosts of Medgar Evers, A Tale of Race, Murder, Mississippi, and Hollywood, by Willie Morris. Random House, 1998. Story of Medgar's murder and the making of Ghosts of Mississippi the movie about the assasination and the reopening of the case.

  • Ghosts of Mississippi: The Murder of Medgar Evers, the Trials of Byron De LA Beckwith, and the Haunting of the New South, by Maryanne Vollers. Little Brown, 1995. The background of race, culture, class, & personality behind Medgar's murder; the two acquittals, the conviction in 1994.

  • Ghosts of Mississippi: The True Story, by Maryanne Vollers. Back Bay Books, 1996. Story of Medgar's murder and the trials of assasin Byron de la Beckwith.

  • God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights, by Charles Marsh. Princeton University Press, 1997. Examination of role religion played in lives of SNCC workers, KKK, and local people. RARE.

  • Going Down Jericho Road: The Memphis Strike, Martin Luther King's Last Campaign, by Michael Honey. W. W. Norton, 2007. Labor activist and historian describes the strike and King's effort to build a new mass movement to push beyond civil rights to economic justice for the poor and working class.

  • Going South: Jewish Women in the Civil Rights Movement, by Debra Schultz & Blance Cook. New York University Press, 2002. Oral histories and analysis of Freedom Movement activists.

  • Gonna Sit at the Welcome Table, by Julian Bond. Forbes, 2000. Extensive history & analysis of the Movement by Julian Bond. RARE.

  • The Good Doctors: The Medical Committee for Human Rights and the Struggle for Social Justice in Health Care, by John Dittmer. Bloomsbury Press, 2009. Story of the courageous MCHR doctors, nurses, and health professionals who cared for the injured and struggled for justice and health-care equality during Freedom Summer, Selma, the anti-war movement, Chicago, Alcatraz, Wounded Knee, and elsewhere.

  • Great Courage, by Anthony E. Amerson. What's Your Story, 2004. Biography of Lucius D. Amerson, the first Black sheriff elected in the South since reconstruction, in racially charged Macon County, Alabama.

  • The Great Pool Jump: & Other Stories from the Civil Rights Movement in Southwest Georgia, by Peter Lissovoy (editor/author). You Are Perfect Press, 2010. Personal stories and memories from the Freedom Movement in Georgia by four dedicated activists. (See The Great Pool Jump for review.) Available from the author at:
    pdel@surfglobal.net
    5 Lost Nation Rd.
    Lancaster, NH 03584

  • Groundwork: Local Black Freedom Movements in America, by Jeanne Theoharris and Komozi Woodard. NYU Press, 2005. Essays on grassroots civil rights activism in the post-WWII period. Covers both Southern & Northern arms of the Movement.

  • The Hand of Esau: Montgomery's Jewish Community And the 1955/56 Bus Boycott, by Mary Stanton. River City Publishing, 2007.

  • Hands on the Freedom Plow: Personal Accounts by Women in SNCC, by SNCC women. University Of Illinois Press, 2010. Testimonies of fifty-two women--northern and southern, young and old, urban and rural, black, white, and Latina--share their courageous personal stories of working for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee on the front lines of the Civil Rights Movement.

  • He Slew the Dreamer: My Search, With James Earl Ray, for the Truth About the Murder of Martin Luther King, Jr. , by William Bradford Huie. Black Belt Press, 1997.

  • Higher Education and the Civil Rights Movement: White Supremacy, Black Southerners, and College Campuses, by Peter Wallenstein. University Press of Florida; First edition, 2008. History/analysis of desegregation of major Southern universities and the continuing struggles for academic change.

  • History of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1955-1965: the Evolution of a Southern Strategy for Social Change by Eugene P Walker. University Microfilms International, 1980. RARE.

  • Hope and History: Why We Must Share the Story of the Movement, by Vincent Harding. Orbis Books, 1990. Series of essays by Movement veteran Vincent Harding on how the Civil Rights Movement affected all aspects of American life.

  • How Long? How Long? African-American Women and the Struggle for Civil Rights, by Belinda Robnett. Describes centrality of women's leadership in the Movement.

  • I Am a Man: Photographs of the 1968 Memphis Sanitation Strike & Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., by Memphis Commercial Appeal staff. Memphis Publishing Company, 1992. RARE.

  • I Have Never Lived in America, by David Dukes. Vantage Press, 2013. Personal account of sit-ins and protests in Florida and their aftermath. RARE.

  • I May Not Get There With You: The True Martin Luther King Jr, Michael Dyson. The Free Press, 2000. Biography of Dr. King emphasizing the radical core of his political beliefs.

  • I Will Not Be Silent and I Will Be Heard: Martin Luther King, and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, J. Tracy Power, Judith M. Brimelow. South Carolina Department of Archives & History, 1993. RARE.

  • If It Takes All Summer: Martin Luther King, the KKK, and States' Rights in St. Augustine, 1964, by Dan Warren. University Alabama Press, 2008. Story of the struggle in St. Augustine written by a Florida official who played a pivotal role in the events.

  • If White Kids Die, Memories of a Civil Rights Movement Volunteer, by Dick J. Reavis. Univ of North Texas Press, 2001. Story of a summer project volunteer and the movement in Demopolis Alabama.

  • In a Madhouse's Din: Civil Rights Coverage by Mississippi's Daily Press, 1948-1968, by Susan Weill. Praeger Publishers, 2002. Chronicles the fight to desegregate Mississippi as reported by local newspapers.

  • In Memphis: More Than a Garbage Strike, by J. Edwin Stanfield. Southern Regional Council, 1968. RARE.

  • In the Mule Train: A Journey of Hope Remembered, by Roland Freeman. Rutledge Hill Press, 1998. Photo documentation of the journey by more than 100 people from Marks MS to Washington DC by mule train to participate in the 1998 Poor Peoples Campaign. RARE.

  • In Peace and Freedom: My Journey in Selma, by Bernard LaFayette & Kathryn Lee Johnson. University Press of Kentucky, 2013. First-hand account of Selma voting rights struggle.

  • In the Shadow of Selma: The Continuing Struggle for Civil Rights in the Rural South, by Cynthia Griggs Fleming. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2004. Story of the Civil Rights Movement in rural Wilcox County, Alabama.

  • In a Single Garment of Destiny": A Global Vision of Justice (King Legacy) by Martin Luther King,, by Lewis V. Baldwin and Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Beacon Press, 2013.

  • In the Struggle Against Jim Crow: Lulu B. White and the NAACP, 1900-1957, by Merline Pitre. Texas A&M University Press, 1999.

  • In Struggle, SNCC and the Black Awakening of the 1960's, Clayborne Carson. Harvard University Press, 1981. History of SNCC from the sit-ins and freedom rides through community organizing, Freedom Summer, to Black Power and dispersal.

  • The Informant: The FBI, the Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola Liuzzo, by Gary May. Yale University Press, 2005.

  • Interviews With Civil Rights Workers from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), by Stanford University Project South Oral History Collection. Microfilming Corp. of America (1975) RARE.

  • Inside Agitators: White Southerners in the Civil Rights Movement, by David L. Chappell, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1994.

  • Interviews With Civil Rights Workers from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), by Stanford University Project South Oral History collection). Microfilming Corp. of America, 1975. RARE.

  • It Was Never About a Hotdog and a Coke: A Personal Account of the 1960 Sit-in Demonstrations in Jacksonville, Florida and Ax Handle Saturday, by Rodney L. Hurst Sr. WingSpan Press, 2008. Part memoir, part history and part biography, provides an in-depth look at those persons whose lives and actions helped make Jacksonville and America what it is today.

  • I've Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition and the Mississippi Freedom Struggle, Charles Payne. Univ of Calif Press, 1995. Rather than focusing on a series of public events, this excellent book describes the internal workings of how the Freedom Movement in Mississippi was organized from the grassroots up over a long period of time. It depicts the Movement from the inside looking out, rather than from the outside looking in. Highly recommended.

  • Jackson, Mississippi: An American Chronicle of Struggle and Schism, by John Salter [AKA Hunter Gray, Hunterbear]. New updated and expanded edition. Bison Books/University of Nebraska Press, 2011. First-hand account of the Jackson MS grassroots movement of 1961-63 and the assassination of Medgar Evers.

  • Jim Crow and Me: Stories from My Life as a Civil Rights Lawyer, by Solomon S. Seay, Delores R. Boyd. NewSouth Books, 2009. Stories and accounts of civil rights courtroom battles by one of the few Black attornies in Alabama during the 1960s.

  • Jim Crow Guide: The Way It Was, by Stetson Kennedy. Florida Atlantic University Press, 1990.

  • Journey From Jim Crow: The Desegregation of Southern Transit, by C.A. Barnes. Columbia University Press, 1983. HARD TO FIND

  • Journey Toward Justice: Juliette Hampton Morgan And the Montgomery Bus Boycott, by Mary Stanton. University of Georgia Press, 2006.

  • Judgment Days: Lyndon Baines Johnson, Martin Luther King, Jr, and the Laws That Changed America, by Nick Kotz. Houghton Mifflin Company. Interaction and relationship between King and LBJ around passage of Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965.

  • Julian Bond: Black Rebel, by John Neary. William Morrow, 1971. RARE.

  • Jumpin' Jim Crow: Southern Politics from Civil War to Civil Rights, by Jane Elizabeth Dailey, Bryant Simon (Editor), Glenda Elizabeth Gilmore (Editor). Princeton University Press, 2000.

  • Keeping the Dream Alive: A History of SCLC from King to the Nineteen-Eighties, by Thomas R. Peake. Peter Lang Publications, 1987.

  • Killing the Dream: James Earl Ray and the Assassination of Martin Luther King, by Gerald L. Posner. Random House, 1998. Argues that Ray was the lone assasin and that there was no broader conspiracy.

  • King: Pilgrimage to the Mountaintop, by Harvard Sitkoff. Hill and Wang, 2007. King biography that emphasizes King's radical message, not just ending segregation and combating racisim, but also anti-war and economic justice.

  • King: The Photobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr, by Bob Adelman and Charles Johnson. Viking Studio, New York, 2000

  • Last Chance for Justice: How Relentless Investigators Uncovered New Evidence Convicting the Birmingham Church Bombers, by T.K. Thorne. Chicago Review Press, 2013. Story of the case of the Sixteenth Street Church bombing in Birmingham, AL ast old from the point of view of the investigators.

  • Last Crusade: MLK, FBI, & Poor People's Campaign, by Gerald D. McKnight, FBI Staff, Poor People's Campaign Staff. Westview Press, 1998. Poor People's Campaign, Resurrection City, and FBI director J. Edgar Hoover campaign against King and the Movement.

  • The Last Segregated Hour: The Memphis Kneel-Ins and the Campaign for Southern Church Desegregation, by Stephen Haynes. Oxford University Press, 2012.

  • Lay Bare the Heart: An Autobiography of the Civil Rights Movement, by James Farmer, Texas Christian University Press, 1998. Personal story of the CORE leader and one of the major figures of the Movement.

  • Legacy of a Freedom School, by Sandra Adickes. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. Movement veteran Sandra Adickes recalls her experiences working with the SNCC.

  • Lessons From Freedom Summer: Ordinary People Building Extraordinary Movements, by Kathy Emery, Linda Reid Gold, Sylvia Braselmann. Courage Press. 2008.

  • Lessons from Little Rock, by Terrence Roberts Butler. Center for Arkansas Studies, 2009.

  • Letters From Mississippi: Reports from Civil Rights Volunteers & Poetry of the 1964 Freedom Summer, Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez. First published by McGraw-Hill, 1965. Expanded and reissued for 50th Anniversary, 2014. Letters and documents from the 1965 Mississippi Freedom Summer project. (See Zephyr Press ~ Letters From Mississippi for more information.)

  • Let the People Decide: Black Freedom and White Resistance Movements in Sunflower County, Mississippi, 1945-1986, by J. Todd Moye. University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

  • Let Us March On!. Selected Civil Rights Photographs of Ernest C. Withers 1955-1968, by Ronald Baily and Michelle Furst. Massachusetts College of Art, 1992.

  • A Life In The Struggle: Ivory Perry and the Culture of Opposition, by George Lipsitz. Temple University Press, 1995. Hard to find.

  • Life Is More than a Moment: The Desegregation of Little Rock's Central High, by Will Counts (writer & photographer), Will Cambell, Ernest Dumas, Robert McCord. Indiana University Press, 1999. Photos and essays by journalists who covered the Little Rock crises in 1957 and followed the long aftermath.

  • Like a Holy Crusade: Mississippi 1964, by Nicolaus Mills. Ivan Dee Inc, 1990. History of the 1964 Mississippi Freedom Summer project. RARE.

  • Like a Mighty Stream: The March on Washington, August 28, 1963, by Patrik Henry Bass. Running Press Book Publishers, 2002.

  • Lift Every Voice: The NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement, by Patricia Sullivan. New Press, 2009.

  • A Little Taste of Freedom: The Black Freedom Struggle in Claiborne County, Mississippi, by Emilye Crosby. University of North Carolina Press, 2005. Explores the impact of the African American freedom struggle in one Mississippi county and a Supreme Court case defending the use of an economic boycott as a tool for social justice.

  • Living in the Shadows of a Legend: Unsung Heroes and Sheroes Who Marched With Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., by Deric A. Gilliard. Gilliard Communications, 2002. Twenty personal stories of rank & file Movement workers written by an SCLC staff member. RARE.

  • Local People: the Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, by John Dittmer. University of Illinois Press, 1995. The Movement in Mississippi from the point of view of the local people who lived it. Winner of Lillian Smith Book Award, McLemore Prize, and Bancroft Prize.

  • A Long Night, Ellen Douglas. Nouveau Press (Mississippi Civil Liberties Union). Narration of the racist riot against Jame Meredith's integration of University of Mississippi ('Ole Miss'). VERY RARE.

  • The Long Shadow of Little Rock: A Memoir by Daisy Bates. University of Arkansas Press, 1987. NAACP leader Daisy Bates' account of the battle to integrate Central High in 1957.

  • Longest Debate: A Legislative History of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, by Charles Whalen, Barbara Whalen. Seven Locks Press, 1984. RARE.

  • Looking Back, Moving Forward: The Southwest Georgia Freedom Struggle, 1814-2014, by Lee Formwalt, ACRI/GHC 2014. History of the 200-year southwest Georgia freedom struggle beginning in 1814 and continuing today.

  • Look Out, Whitey! Black Power's Gon' Get Your Mama!, by Julius Lester. Grove Press, 1969. RARE.

  • Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin, by John D'Emilio. Free Press, 2003. Biography of Bayard Rustin. The organizer of the March on Washington (1963), an advisor to Dr. King, a teacher of Gandhian nonviolence, and one of the original motivating leaders of the Movement.

  • Lunch at the Five and Ten, by Miles Wolff. Dee, Ivan R. Publisher, 1990. History of the Greensboro sit-ins.

  • The Making of Black Revolutionaries, Jim Forman. University of Washington Press, September 1997 (originally published 1972). Autobiography and movement history by SNCC Chairman Jim Forman.

  • The Making of Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights Movement, by Brian Ward and Tony Badger. NYU Press, 1996.

  • Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940, by Grace Elizabeth Hale. Random House, 1999.

  • Man from Macedonia: My Life of Service, Struggle, Faith, and Hope, by Rev. Aaron Johnson. WestBowPress, 2010. Autobiography of sharecroppers son who became a minister, led sit-ins, and became a Freedom Movement leader in North Carolina.

  • Managing White Supremacy: Race, Politics, and Citizenship in Jim Crow Virginia, by J. Douglas Smith. University of North Carolina Press, 2002.

  • Many Minds, One Heart: SNCC's Dream for a New America , by Wesley C. Hogan. University of North Carolina Press, 2007. History and analysis of SNCC, SNCC's role in the Freedom Movement, and the influence of SNCC on subsequent movements for progressive social change.

  • March On Washington: August 28, 1963, Thomas Gentile. New Day Publications, 1963. Detailed history and analysis of events leading up to the march and the march itself. RARE.

  • The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights, by William P. Jones. W.W. Norton & Company, 2013

  • The March on Washington: Uniting Against Racism, by Robin Doak. Compass Point Books, 2007. Ages 11 and up.

  • The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, by Bruce Hartford. Westwind Writers, 2012. [Kindle Book]

  • Marks Mississipi, Martin Luther King, and the Origin of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign Mule Train, by Hilliard Lawrence Lackey. Town Square Books, 1999. RARE.

  • Martin Luther King, by Adam Fairclough. University of Georgia Press, 1995. Biography of Dr. King.

  • The Martin Luther King, Jr., Companion: Quotations from the Speeches, Essays, and Books, by Martin Luther King, Coretta Scott King, (editor). St. Martin's Press, 1993.

  • Martin Luther King: The Inconvenient Hero, by Vincent Harding. Orbis Books, 1996. The forgotten legacy of MLK, the meaning of his life today, and the ambiguous messages surrounding the official celebration of his birthday.

  • Martin's Dream: My Journey and the Legacy of Martin Luther King Jr., by Clayborne Carson. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

  • The Martinsville Seven: Race, Rape, and Capital Punishment, by Eric W. Rise. Univ. of Virginia Press. Describes the trial, and campaign to save from execution, seven Black men accused of raping a white women in Virginia.

  • The Measure of a Man, by Martin Luther King. Pilgrim Press, 1959. Selection of Dr. King's early sermons.

  • Medgar Evers, by Michael Vinson Williams. University of Arkansas Press, 2011. Definitive biography.

  • Medgar Evers (Melrose Square Black American Series), by Jennie Brown. Holloway House Publishing Company, 1994.

  • Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement, Danny Lyon, Foreword by Julian Bond. University of North Carolina Press, 1992. Republished by Twin Palms in 2010 including a new afterward. Available from: Twin Palms. Danny Lyon was the SNCC photographer who covered many of the major Freedom Movement campaigns and projects. This is his narrative and a collection of some of the most moving and powerful images to come out of the Movement. (See also Danny Lyon's website, Bleak Beauty.

  • The Memphis Multi-Media Archival Project: The 1968 Sanitation Workers' Strike, by David G Yellin. Final report to the National Endowment for the Humanities (J.W. Brister Library monograph series). RARE.

  • Memphis Workers Fight: The City Sanitation Workers' Strike, by Fred Lacey. New England Free Press (1969). RARE.

  • A Mighty Long Way: My Journey to Justice at Little Rock Central High School, by Carlotta Walls Lanier and Lisa Frazier. Ballantine, 2009.

  • Minds Stayed On Freedom, by Youth of the Rural Organization And Cultural Center. Westview Press, 1991. Inteviews with Freedom Movement participants conducted by teenagers in Holmes County Mississippi.

  • Miracle in Birmingham: A Civil Rights Memoir 1954-1965, by W. Edward Harris. Stonework Press, 2004. Birmingham struggle as seen through the eyes of a sympathetic white-liberal reporter. Hard to find.

  • Mississippi: Conflict and Change, by Jim Loewen and Charles Sallis. Pantheon, 1974, 1980. The first revisionist state history textbook ever published, and the first Southern state history to give a full account of all races, including of course the Civil Rights Movement. RARE.

  • Mississippi Eyes, by Matt Herron. Talking Fingers Publications, May, 2014. Photos from the Mississippi Freedom Movement by Mat Herron, George Ballis, Nick Lawrence, Dave Prince, and Danny Lyon.

  • Mississippi From Within, by Shirley Tucker. Arco Publishing, 1965. News clippings from Mississippi newspapers during the height of the Movement. Most are from papers that were pro-segregation and virulently anti-Movement. Also includes many never before published photos taken by Movement photographers. RARE.

  • Mississippi Harmony, Memoirs of a Freedom Fighter, by Winson Hudson & Constance Curry. Macmillen, 2002. Winson Hudson's decades- long struggle for justice in the heart of Mississippi.

  • The Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission: Civil Rights and States' Rights, by Yasuhiro Katagiri. University Press of Mississippi, 2001. History and analysis of the infamouse Sovereignty Commission and their efforts to suppress the Movement.

  • The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It, by Jo Ann Gibson Robinson. University of Tennessee Press, 1990. Memoir of the bus boycott by one of its leaders who headed the Women's Political Council of Montgomery.

  • The Movement, Lorrain Hansberry and Elizabeth (Betita) Martinez. Simon & Schuster, 1964. Outstanding photo-essay history of the Movement's early years. Now rare and hard to find, but beloved and treasured by those lucky enough to possess a copy. VERY RARE.

  • Murder in Memphis: The FBI and the Assassination of Martin Luther King, by Mark Lane, Dick Gregory. Thunder's Mouth Press, 1993.

  • The Murkin Conspiracy: An Investigation Into the Assassination of Martin Luther King, by Philip H. Melanson. Praeger Publishers (April 17, 1989). Argues that King was killed by conspiracy much broader than a single assasin. ("Murkin" was the FBI's codename for King's assasination "investigation.")

  • The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement: Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968, by David C. Carter. The University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

  • My Brother J-Boy, by Hazel Janell Meredith. Amerikan Press, 2011. Fictional story in segregated South by sister of James Meredith.

  • My Family The Movement & Me, by Cathy Cade. Privately published 2002. Fascinating story of how the author's family responded to her Movement activity and arrest in Albany GA. To order a copy send email to: cathy@cathycade.com, or $15 pluse $3 for shipping to Cathy Cade, 2202 Rosedale Ave, Oakland, CA 94601.

  • My Soul Looks Back in Wonder: Voices of the Civil Rights Experience, by Juan Williams. Sterling; (2004), 30 personal stories from the front lines of the freedom struggle.

  • My Soul is a Witness: Cronology of the Civil Rights Era 1954 — 1965, by Betty Collier-Thomas and V.P. Franklin. Henry Holt, 2000. History of the Civil Rights Movement both South and North.

  • My Soul is Rested: The Story of the Civil Rights Movement in the Deep South, Howell Raines. Putnam, 1977. Collection of personal statements and reminisces of Movement activists and leaders from Montgomery Bus Boycott through Dr. King's assasination.

  • My Summer Vacation: 1965, by Mary Swope. Self-published, 2011 (can be obtained directly from author at: alphogal@sonic.net). Experiences of an SCLC/SCOPE volunteer in Georgia, Alabama, and Virginia.

  • The Nashville Way: Racial Etiquette and the Struggle for Social Justice in a Southern City, by Benjamin Houston. University of Georgia Press.

  • Negroes With Guns, by Robert F. Williams. First published in 1962 by Marzani & Munsell, republished in 1998 by Wayne State University Press. Story of civil rights in Monroe NC and armed self-defense against the KKK & police.

  • The Negro Revolt, Louis Lomax. Harper & Row, 1962, 1963. Background and early years of the Movement. RARE.

  • New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975, by William L. Van Deburg. University Of Chicago Press, 1993.

  • Nobody Turn Me Around: A People's History of the 1963 March on Washington, by Charles Euchner. Beacon Press, 2011

  • No Color is My Kind: The Life of Eldreway Stearns and the Integration of Houston, by Thomas R. Cole. University of Texas Press, 1997.

  • No Easy Victories: African Liberation and American Activists over a Half Century, 1950-2000, by William Minter, Gail Hovey, and Charles Cobb Jr. Africa World Press, August 2007. While U.S. based groups and individuals contributed to African liberation, African struggles also inspired U.S. activism, including the civil rights and black power movements. No Easy Victories draws on the voices of activists of several generations to explore this largely untold history. Available from No Easy Victories and Africa World Press.

  • The Norfolk 17: A Personal Narrative on Desegregation in Norfolk, Virginia, in 1958 1962, by Andrew Heidelberg. RoseDog Books, 2006.

  • Northern Protest: Martin Luther King, Chicago, and the Civil Rights Movement, by James Ralph. Harvard University Press, 1993. Scholarly examination of Dr. King's effort to oppose housing discrimination in Chicago.

  • Now Is the Time, by Lillian Smith. University Press of Mississippi, 2004 (originally published in 1955). Immediately after the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, Georgia novelist and activist Lillian Smith (author of Strange Fruit and Killers of the Dream sensed white readers needed a hard look at the costs of segregated schools. So in 1955 she published Now Is the Time, a book brought back in print by the University Press of Mississippi.

  • Of Long Memory: Mississippi and the Murder of Medgar Evers, by Adam Nossiter. Da Capo Press. Uses the Medgar's murder and belated prosecution of the assassin Byron de la Beckwith to examine Mississippi then and now.

  • Old South, New South, or Down South?: Florida and the Modern Civil Rights Movement, by Irvin D.S. Winsboro. West Virginia University Press, 2009.

  • On the Road to Freedom: A Guided Tour of the Civil Rights Trail, by Charles Cobb Jr. Algonquin Books, 2008. In-depth look at the civil rights movement goes to the places where pioneers of the movement marched, sat-in at lunch counters, gathered in churches; where they spoke, taught, and organized; where they were arrested, where they lost their lives, and where they triumphed.

  • Open Dem Cells: A Pictorial History of the Albany Movement, by Mary Royal Jenkins. Brentwood Academic Press, 2000.

  • Open Wide the Freedom Gates: A Memoir, by Dorothy Height. Public Affairs, 2003. Personal memoir of a major figure in the Civil Rights Movement. A contemporary of Dr. King, W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Eleanor Roosevelt, Mary McLeod Bethune, Adam Clayton Powell Sr., Langston Hughes, and often the only woman involved in the Movement at the highest leaderhsip level.

  • The Orangeburg Massacre, by Nelson & Bass. Mercer Univeristy Press, 1999.

  • Orders to Kill: The Truth Behind the Murder of Martin Luther King, by William F. Pepper. Carroll & Graf, 1995. (See updated version: Conspiracy: The Truth Behind Martin Luther King's Murder)

  • Origins of the Civil Rights Movement: Black Communities Organizing for Change, by Aldon D. Morris. Free Press, 1986. Comprehensive study of the Movement's origin and strategies, with emphasis on role played by women.

  • Our Minds on Freedom: Women and the Struggle for Black Equality in Louisiana, 1924-1967, by Shannon Frystak. LSU Press, 2009

  • Our Separate Ways: Women   Black Freedom Movement in Durham, by Christina Greene. Univ. of North Carolina Press. 2005

  • Outside Agitator: Jon Daniels and the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama, by Charles Eagles. University of Alabama Press, 2000. Describes Alabama voting rights movement and the assassination of Father Daniels.

  • Pain and the Promise: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Tallahassee, Florida, by Glenda Alice Rabby. University of Georgia Press, 1999. The Movement in Tallahassee including the 1956 bus boycott and CORE organizing in the 60s.

  • Papers of the Congress of Racial Equality, 1941- 1967, A Guide to the Microfilm Edition, by Microfilming Corporation of America, 1980. Chadwyck-Healey Incorporated. RARE.

  • Parting the Waters, America in the King Years 1954-1963, Taylor Branch. Simon & Schuster, 1988. Volume One of Pulitzer Prize winning history of the Movement. Including the Movement's early years from Montgomery bus boycott, the Sit- ins and Freedom Rides, the Albany, Birmingham, and St. Augustine Movements, the March on Washington, and much more. See also Pillar of Fire and At Canaan's Edge.

  • Partners to History: Martin Luther King, Ralph David Abernathy, and the Civil Rights Movement, by Donzaleigh Abernathy. Crown, 2003. Large-format book by Abernathy's youngest daughter, contains personal memories, history, speeches and 375 photos.

  • Peace and Freedom: The Civil Rights and Antiwar Movements in the 1960s, by Simon Hall. University of Pennsylvania Press, 2006. Explores the links between the CRM and the Vietnam War and the relationship between Black organizations and the Anti-War Movement.

  • Pillar of Fire, America in the King Years 1963-1965, Taylor Branch. Simon & Schuster, 1988. Volume Two of Pulitzer Prize winning history of the Movement. Including the Movement in the North, Freedom Summer, the MFDP challenge, and more. See also Parting the Waters and At Canaan's Edge.

  • The Politics of Injustice: The Kennedys, the Freedom Rides, and the Electoral Consequences of a Moral Compromise, by David Niven. University of Tennessee Press, 2003. Analysis & critique of the political calculations behind JFK's reluctant and limited support for the Civil Rights Movement.

  • Poor People's Campaign & March on Washington: Mobilization for Collective Protest, by Albert E Gollin Bureau of Social Science Research (1969). RARE.

  • Powerful Days. Civil rights photography of Charles Moore.

  • Pure Fire: Self-Defense as Activism in the Civil Rights Era, by Christopher B. Strain. University of Georgia Press, 2005. History of self-defense as it was debated and practiced during the civil rights era of the 1950s and 1960s.

  • Press and Race: Mississippi Journalists Confront the Movement, by David R. Davies (Editor). University Press of Mississippi, 2001, Essays on how 9 different Mississippi editors and their newspapers from "moderate" to segregationist covered the civil rights movement in their state from Brown v BoE to the Voting Rights Act of 1965. RARE.

  • The Price of Defiance: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss, by Charles Eagles. University of North Carolina Press, 2009.

  • Profiles in Black Power, by James Haskins. Doubleday, 1972. RARE.

  • Protest at Selma: Martin Luther King, Jr., and the Voting Rights Act of 1965, by David J. Garrow. Yale University Press, 2001.

  • Quiet Revolution in the South: The Impact of the Voting Rights Act, 1965-1990, by Chandler Davidson (Editor), Bernard N. Grofman (Editor). Princeton University Press.

  • The Race Beat: The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation, by Gene Roberts & Hank Klibanoff. Knopf, 2006.

  • Race and Democracy: The Civil Rights Struggle in Louisiana, 1915-1972, by Adam Fairclough. University of Georgia Press, 1995. History of the civil rights movement in Louisiana with emphasis on the variety, depth, and durability of black protest beyond the action-oriented, youth-dominated 1960s, and particularly role of NAACP.

  • Race, Reform, and Rebellion: the Second Reconstruction of Black America from 1945-1982, by Marable Manning. University Press of Mississippi 1991 or St. Martins Press 1997. RARE.

  • Racial Change and Community Crisis: St. Augustine, Florida, 1877-1980, by David R. Colburn. University Press of Florida, 1991. RARE.

  • A Racial Crime: James Earl Ray And The Murder Of Martin Luther King, by Mel Ayton. Archebooks Publishing, 2005. Argues that James Earl Ray was the lone assasin and that there was no broader conspiracy.

  • Racial Matters: The FBI's Secret File on Black America, 1960-1972, by Kenneth O'Reilly. Free Press (Reprint edition, 1991). Expose of the FBI's opposition to the Civil Rights Movement, and the Bureau's own institutional racism.

  • Radical Equations: Civil Rights from Mississippi to the Algebra Project, by Robert Moses & Charles Cobb Jr.. Beacon Press, 2001. About the Civil Rights Movement, the Algebra Project, and why math literacy is a key step in the fight for equal citizenship.

  • Radicalizing the Ebony Tower: Black Colleges and the Black Freedom Struggle in Mississippi, by Joy Ann Williamson. Economic Policy Institute and Teachers College, 2008. Examines how students combined their pursuit of higher education with campus and societal reforms and also how students challenged the notion of the Ivory Tower.

  • Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams & the Roots of Black Power, by Timothy B. Tyson. University of North Carolina Press, 1999. Story of Robert F. Williams and "armed self-reliance" by Blacks.

  • Ready for Revolution: The Life and Struggles of Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture), by Stokely Carmichael with Ekwueme Michael Thelwell. Scribner, 2003. Autobiography of freedom fighter who headed SNCC.

  • Ready From Within: Septima Clark and the Civil Rights Movement, Septima Poinsette Clark, Cynthia Stokes Brown. Africa World Press, 1990. First-person narrative of Septima Clark one of the unsung heroines of the Movement.

  • Reaping the Whirlwind: The Civil Rights Movement in Tuskegee, by Robert J. J. Norrell, Arieh J. Kochavi. University of North Carolina Press, 1998. Traces the course of the Movement in Tuskegee, Alabama, and the role of Tuskegee Institute students. First published in 1985 and updated for this edition.

  • Rebellion in Black and White: Southern Student Activism in the 1960s, by Robert Cohen, David J. Snyder, Dan T. Carter. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2013.

  • Records of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, 1954-1970, by Randolph Boehm, Blair Hydrick, University Publications of America Staff, Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Publisher: University Publications of America, 1995.

  • To Redeem the Soul of America: the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King Jr., by Adam Fairclough. University of Georgia Press, 2001.

  • Religion and the Rise of Jim Crow in New Orleans, by James B. Bennett. Princeton University Press, 2005.

  • Remembering Jim Crow: African Americans Tell about Life in the Segregated South, by William Henry Chafe (Editor), Robert Korstad (Editor), Raymond Gavins (Editor), Behind the Veil Project Staff. New Press, 2001.

  • Remember: The Journey to School Integration, by Toni Morrison. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004. Collection of school integration photos combined with fictional story and dialog of students who experienced it.

  • Reporting Civil Rights: American Journalism 1941-1973, Volumes 1 and 2, by Clayborne Carson, David J. Garrow, Bill Kovach, Carol Polsgrove. Library of America, 2003. Comprehensive and authoritative collection of articles and essays about the civil rights struggle in the U.S. by some of America's greatest writers and reporters such as James Baldwin, David Halberstam, Anne Moody, Gordon Parks, Claude Sitton, Lillian Smith, and Robert Penn Warren.

  • The Rhetoric of Black Power, by Wayne Brockriede, Robert Lee Scott. Greenwood Pub Group, 1979. RARE.

  • Rhetoric, Religion and the Civil Rights Movement 1954-1965, by Davis W. Houck and David E. Dixon. Baylor University Press 2006. (Studies in Rhetoric and Religion)

  • River of No Return: The Autobiography of a Black Militant and the Life and Death of SNCC, by Cleveland Sellers with Robert Terrell. University Press of Mississippi, 1990.

  • Ruby McCollum: Woman in the Suwannee Jail, by William Bradford Huie. Signet - New American Library, 1964. "Paramour Rights" murder trial. RARE.

  • Rural Face of White Supremacy: Beyond Jim Crow, by Mark Schultz. University of Illinois Press, 2005.

  • Sacred Places: A Guide to the Civil Rights Sites in Atlanta, Georgia, by Harry G. Lefever and Michael C. Page. Mercer University Press, 2008.

  • St. Augustine, Florida, 1963-1964: Mass Protest and Racial Violence, by David J. Garrow (Editor). Carlson Publications, 1989. RARE

  • Sammy Younge, Jr.: The First Black College Student to Die in the Black Liberation Movement, by James Forman, Grove Press, 1968. RARE.

  • The SCOPE of Freedom: The Leadership of Hosea Williams With Dr. King's Summer '65 Student Volunteers, by Willy Siegel-Levanthal, Challenge Publishing, 2005. Provides a documentary overview of the historical period that followed the Selma-Montgomery voting rights march. RARE.

  • The Selling of Civil Rights: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Use of Public Relations, by Vanessa Murphree. Routledge, 2006.

  • Selma 1965: The March That Changed the South, 3rd Edition. Charles E. Fager. Kimo Press, 2005. Story of the Selma campaign 1964-65 and the March to Montgomery by an SCLC field worker.

  • The Selma Campaign, 1963-1965, by Wally Vaughn. Majority Press, 2006. Overview & oral histories from Selma.

  • Selma, Lord, Selma, Sheyann Webb and Rachel West Nelson. University of Alabama Press, 1980. Memoir of Selma's "youngest freedom fighters," Sheyann 8 and Rachel 9.

  • The Selma Voting Rights Struggle and March to Montgomery, by Bruce Hartford. Westwind Writers, April 2014. The Timeline & History articles about Selma and the March to Montgomery.

  • The Senator and the Sharecropper: The Freedom Struggles of James O. Eastland and Fannie Lou Hamer, by Chris Myers Asch. The New Press, 2008. This book examines the movement through the lives of two polar opposites — Mississippi's segregationist Senator Eastland, and Fannie Lou Hamer, the sharecropper who lived five miles away from him who became the spiritual leader of the Mississippi movement.

  • The Shadows of Youth: The Remarkable Journey of the Civil Rights Generation, by Andrew B. Lewis. Hill and Wang, 2009. Group biography of selected SNCC activists tracing their lives and their effect on modern history.

  • Shared Dreams: Martin Luther King Jr. and the Jewish Community, by Marc Schneier. Jewish Lights Publishing, 1999. Account of Dr. King's interaction with Jews and the Jewish community and the role they played in the Civil Rights Movement. RARE.

  • Sharing the Dream: Martin Luther King, the Movement, and Me, by Dora E. McDonald. Hill Street Press, 2002. Personal memoir of Dr. King's long-time secretary and aide. RARE.

  • The Silencing of Ruby McCollum: Race, Class, And Gender in the South, by Jacqueline Jones Royster. University Press of Florida, 2006. "Paramour Rights" murder trial & reaction.

  • Silver Rights, by Constance Curry. Harcourt, 1998. The powerful story African-American sharecroppers on a cotton plantation in Sunflower County, Mississippi who sent seven of their thirteen children to desegregate the all-white school system in 1965.

  • Simple Justice: The History of Brown v. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality, by Richard Kluger. Vintage, 2004. Major overview of not only the Brown case but the Movement as a whole. New & updated edition for 50th anniversary of Brown including analysis of Republican "Southern Strategy."

  • Sing for Freedom: the Story of the Civil Rights Movement Through its Songs, by Guy and Candie Carawan, Sing Out Corporation 1990, reissued by New South Books in 2008. A compilation of two earlier Sing Out books We Shall Overcome and Freedom is a Constant Struggle. This is the authoritative collection of freedom song lyrics and music, accompanied by descriptions of the Movement events where the songs originated or were sung.

  • Sisters in the Struggle: African-American Women in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements, by Bettye Collier-Thomas (Editor), V. P. Franklin (Editor). New York University Press, 2001. Anthology of pieces written by Black women active in the Movement.

  • Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down, by Andrea & Brian Pinkney. Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, (2010) Recommended for grades: 3-6.

  • The Sit-In Movement of 1960, by Martin Oppenheimer. Carlson Publishing, 1989. HARD TO FIND.

  • The Sit-in Movement: Progress Report and Prognosis, by Marion A Wright. Wayne State University Law School (1963). RARE.

  • Sitting for Equal Service: Lunch Counter Sit-Ins, United States, 1960s, by Melody Herr. Twenty-First Century Books, 2010.

  • The Smell of Burning Crosses, by Ira B. Harkey Jr. Xlibris, 2006. Story of Pulitzer Prize winning, anti-segregation newspaper editor in Pascagula Mississippi.

  • Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee: the Growth of Radicalism in a Civil Rights Organization, by Emily Stoper. Harvard dissertation 1968, Carlson Publishing, 1989. RARE.

  • SNCC: The New Abolitionists, Howard Zinn. 1964, 1965. South End Press 2002 (reissue). Outstanding history and vivid description of SNCC work in Mississippi, Georgia, Alabama and elsewhere 1960-65. Written at the time by one who was there. HARD TO FIND.

  • Soon We Will Not Cry: The Liberation of Ruby Doris Smith Robinson, by Cynthia Griggs Fleming. Rowman & Littlefield, 1998. Biography of a major leader and activist in SNCC and the struggle for women's rights.

  • South of the South: Jewish Activists and the Civil Rights Movement in Miami, 1945-1960, by Raymond Mohl. University Press of Florida, 2003.

  • The Southern Freedom Movement in Perspective, by Anne Braden. Monthly Review Press, 1965. Description and analysis of the Movement written as it was occuring by an activist at the center of the struggle. RARE.

  • Southern Governors and Civil Rights: Racial Segregation as a Campaign Issue in the Second Reconstruction. , by Earl Black. Harvard University Press, 1976.

  • Southern Journey: A Return to the Civil Rights Movement, by Tom Dent. University of Georgia Press, 2001. Black civil rights worker returns to the South in the 1990s to study the effect the Movement has had on the South and on himself. RARE.

  • Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer, To Tell It Like It Is, edited by Maegan Parker Brooks and Davis W. Houck. University Press of Mississippi, 2011.

  • Spies of Mississippi: The True Story of the Spy Network that Tried to Destroy the Civil Rights Movement, by Rick Bowers. National Geographic Children's Books, 2010. Written for young adults, describes how the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission tried to use spying, sabotage, and state-sponsored repression to prevent African-Americans from winning equal rights as U.S. Citizens. Recommended for grades 7-10.

  • Stealth Reconstruction: An Untold Story of Racial Politics in Recent Southern History, by Glen Browder & Artemesia Stanberry. New South Books, 2010. Chronicles behind the scenes biracial work of Black leaders and some white politicians.

  • Step by Step, Douglas Dowd and Mary Nichols. Norton, 1965. Evolution and history of Fayette County (Tenn) project in 1964. RARE.

  • Stokely: A Life, by Joseph Peniel. Basic Civitas Books, 2014.

  • Stokely Carmichael: The Story of Black Power (History of Civil Rights Series), by Jacqueline Johnson. Silver Burdett Press, 1990.

  • Stokely Speaks: From Black Power to Pan-Africanism, by Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture). Lawrence Hill Books. Collection of speeches and articles by Stokely.

  • A Stone of Hope: Prophetic Religion and the Death of Jim Crow, by David L. Chappell. University of North Carolina Press, 2004. Role of Old Testiment religion in the Movement. Argues that the Movement was less a political protest with religious dimensions than a religious revival with political and social dimensions.

  • Stranger At the Gates: A Summer in Mississippi, by Tracy Sugarman. Hill and Wang, 1965. One of the first personal accounts of Freedom Summer to be published. Rare and hard to find.

  • Strange Career of Jim Crow, by C. Vann Woodward. Oxford University Press, 2001.

  • Stranger At the Gates: A Summer in Mississippi, by Tracy Sugarman. Hill and Wang, 1966. RARE.

  • Strength to Love, Martin Luther King. Harper & Row, 1963. Selection of sermons.

  • Stride Toward Freedom, by Martin Luther King. Harper & Row, 1958. Dr. King's account of the Montgomery bus boycott movement.

  • Struggle for a Better South: The Southern Student Organizing Committee, 1964-1969, by Gregg L. Michel. Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. SSOC was an organization of southern white students who struggled in local white communities against racism, to end the war in Vietnam, and build an inter-racial movement for justice and equality.

  • The Struggle for Black Equality, 1964-1980, by Harvard Sitkoff. Hill & Wang, 1992.

  • Student Activism and Civil Rights in Mississippi ~ Protest Politics and the Struggle for Racial Justice, 1960-1965, by James P. Marshall. LSU Press, 2013. Detailed historic account of student protestors and local activists in Mississippi who risked their lives by fighting against southern resistance and federal inaction by a veteran of the Mississippi movement and CORE activist.

  • Subversive Southerner, Ann Braden and the Struggle for Racial Justice in the Cold War South, by Catherine Fosl. Palgrave Macmillen, 2002. Biography of famed civil rights activist Ann Braden.

  • The Summer That Didn't End: The Story of the Mississippi Civil Rights Project of 1964, by Len Holt. First-hand account and analysis of Freedom Summer by civil rights attorney and activist Len Holt. Originally published 1965 by Morrow, reprinted by Da Capo Press in 1992. HARD TO FIND.

  • Sumter County Blues: The Ordeal of the Federation of Southern Cooperatives, by Thomas N Bethell. The Committee, 1982. RARE.

  • Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of Segregation in America, by James W. Loewen (author of Lies My Teacher Told Me). The New Press, 2005. Sundown towns are communities that for decades were (some still are) all-white on purpose.

  • Sweet Land of Liberty: The Forgotten Struggle for Civil Rights in the North, by Thomas J. Sugrue. Random House, 2008. Describes and analyzes the Freedom Movement in the North from the 1920s to the present day. Exposes the hidden realities of northern racism and its underlying economic and poliltical base.

  • Ten Blocks from the White House: An Anatomy of the Washington Riots of 1968, by Ben W. Gilbert. F. A. Praeger, 1968. Poor People's Campaign and Resurrection City, 1968. RARE.

  • A Testament of Hope: the Essential Writing of Martin Luther King Jr., edited by James Melvin Washington. Harper-Collins, 1991. Collection of Dr. King's speeches, interviews, writings, etc.

  • They Closed Their Schools: Prince Edward County, Virginia, 1951-1964, by R. C. Smith. Story of the student boycott against school segregation that directly led to Brown v Board of Education Supreme Court ruling. RARE.

  • There Is a River: The Black Struggle for Freedom in America, by Vincent Harding Harvest/HBJ Book. 1993.

  • These Few Also Paid a Price, by G. McLeod Bryan. Mercer University Press, 2001. Testimonies of Southern whites who participated in the Civil Rights Movement.

  • This Bright Light of Ours: Stories from the Voting Rights Fight, by Maria Gitin. University of Alabama Press, 2014. An insider's experience of the community-based activism in one Alabama county that was the heart of the civil rights movement.

  • This Is the Day: The March on Washington, by Leonard Freed. J. Paul Getty Museum, 2013

  • This Light of Ours: Activist Photographers of the Civil Rights Movement, by Charles Cobb, Leslie Kelen, Julian Bond, Clayborne Carson, Matt Herron. University Press of Mississippi/The Center for Documentary Arts, 2012.

  • Three Years in Mississippi, by James H. Meredith, Indiana University Press, 1966. Meredith's first-hand account of his effort to desegregate the Univ. of Mississippi (Ol Miss). In the words of one reviewer: "Part report and part legal brief, part manifesto, part tract, it is a valuable and fascinating account." RARE.

  • This Little Light of Mine: the Life of Fannie Lou Hamer , by Kay Mills. Dutton, 1994. Moving Young-Adult/Adult biography of a central figure in the Civil Rights Movement.

  • The Thunder of Angels: The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the People Who Broke the Back of Jim Crow, by Donnie Williams, Wayne Greenhaw. Chicago Review Press, 2005. Detailed examination of the Montgomery Bus Boycott based on extensive interviews, personal accounts from both sides, and documentary evidence.

  • Thunder of Freedom: Black Leadership and the Transformation of 1960s Mississippi, by Sue (Lorenzi) Sojourner. Kentucky University Press, 2013. Detailed study of the Freedom Movement in Holmes County, MS. Civil Rights and the Struggle for Black Equality. See www.suesojourner.com for more information.

  • Time of Change, Civil Rights Photographs 1961-1965, by Bruce Davidson. St. Ann's Press, 2002. Collection of Bruce Davidson's photographs of the Freedom Movement.

  • Time on Two Crosses: The Collected Writings of Bayard Rustin, by Bayard Rustin. Cleis Press, July 2003.

  • To the Mountaintop: My Journey Through the Civil Rights Movement, by Charlayne Hunter-Gault. Flash Point (Macmillan) 2012. Personal story Freedom Movement activist and journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault.

  • Three Lives for Mississippi, by William Bradford Huie. University Press of Mississippi, 2000.

  • A Traveler's Guide to the Civil Rights Movement, by Jim Carrier. Harcourt, 2004. Part guidebook, part civil rights primer, covers the locations of significant events and provides background.

  • Trial of Ruby McCollum, by Drs Arthur and Leslie Ellis. 1st Books, 2003 (available online). The murder trial of a Black women that challenged "Paramour Rights" — the unwritten antebellum law giving a white man the right to a "Negro" woman whether she was married or not.

  • The Trumpet of Conscience, by Martin Luther King. Harper & Row, 1968. Transcription of King's six Massey Lectures as recorded by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. His last statements on racism, poverty, justice, war, and the necessity of nonviolent revolution. (See Conscience for Change: Massey Lectures for audio version.)

  • Trouble in Mind: Black Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow, by Leon F. Litwack. Knopf , 1999.

  • Undaunted By The Fight: Spelman College and the Civil Rights Movement, 1957-1967, by Harry G. Lefever. Mercer University Press, 2005. Story of Spellman College students and faculty in the Civil Rights Movement.

  • Understanding the Little Rock Crisis: An Exercise in Remembrance and Reconciliation, Elizabeth Jacoway and C. Fred Williams (Editors) University of Arkansas Press 1999. Selected scholarly papers from 1997 conference held to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the crisis. History, economic, constitutional, historical, and personal aspects of the crisis and of segregation.

  • The Unfinished Agenda of The Selma-Montgomery Voting Rights March, by Tavis Smiley. Wiley, John & Sons, 2005.

  • Unlikely Heroes, by Jack Bass. University Alabama Press, 1990. Story of 5th U.S. Circut Court of Appeals role in fighting for civil rights.

  • Vernon Can Read! A Memoir, by Vernon E. Jordan, Annette Gordon-Reed. Public Affairs, 2001. Memoir of civil rights leader Vernon Jordan.

  • Virus of Fear: The Infamous Resurrection and Demise of the Carolinas' Ku Klux Klan, by W. Horace Carter. Mississippi River Pub Co, 1992.

  • A Voice That Could Stir an Army: Fannie Lou Hamer and the Rhetoric of the Black Freedom Movement, by Maegan Parker Brooks. University Press of Mississippi, 2014. A biograph of Mrs. Hamers using her own writings and speeches.

  • Voices in Our Blood: America's Best on the Civil Rights Movement, by Jon Meacham (editor). Random House, 2001. Collection of essays by writers such as Baldwin, Wright, Walker, Faulkner, Angelou, Ellison, and others.

  • Voices of Freedom: An Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement 1950-1980, by Henry Hampton & Steven Fayer. Bantam 1991. Compendium of some of the interviews that formed the basis of the PBS series "Eyes on the Prize."

  • The Voting Rights Act: Consequences and Implications, by Lorn S. Foster. Praeger Publishers, 1985.

  • Waiting 'Til the Midnight Hour: A Narrative History of Black Power in America, by Peniel E. Joseph. Holt Paperbacks, 2007.

  • Walking With the Wind, John Lewis and Michael D'Orso. Simon & Schuster, 1998. The Movement as seen and lived through the eyes of SNCC Chairman John Lewis.

  • Warriors Don't Cry: A Searing Memoir of the Battle to Integrate Little Rock's Central High, by Melba Patillo Beals. Pocket Books, 1994. The events in Little Rock as experienced by one of the nine Black children who courageously faced the racist mobs.

  • We Are Not Afraid: The Story of and the Civil Rights Campaign for Mississippi. Seth Cagin and Philip Dray. Bantan Books, 1988. The Mississippi Movement, Freedom Summer, and the murders of Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner.

  • We Charge Genocide," by Patterson, Davis, Ossie, & others. Civil Rights Congress, 1951. VERY RARE.

  • We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns: The Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi, by Tracy Sugarman. Syracuse University Press, 2009. An introspective memoir complete with many of his original illustrations composed at the time by a Freedom Summer volunteer.

  • We Shall Not Be Moved The Jackson Woolworth's Sit-In and the Movement It Inspired, by M.J. O'Brien. University Press of Mississippi, 2013. Story of 1963 Jackson MS sit-in, Medgar Evers, and the Jackson Freedom Movement.

  • We Shall Overcome, The History of the Civil Rights Movement as It Happened, by Herb Boyd. Sourcebooks MediaFusion, 2004.

  • We Shall Overcome: Martin Luther King and the Black Freedom Struggle, by Peter Albert and Ronald Hoffman (editors). De Capo Press, 1993. Anthology of contemporary accounts of the movement.

  • Weary Feet, Rested Souls: A Guided History of the Civil Rights Movement, by Townsend Davis. Norton, 1999. Retraces the history of the Civil Rights Movement through interviews with more than 100 Movement veterans.

  • We Return Fighting: The Civil Rights Movement in the Jazz Age, by Mark Robert Schneider. Northeastern University Press, 2001. Story of NAACP fight for Justice in the post-World War I era of 1920s.

  • We Shall Overcome, by Herb Boyd. Sourcebooks, 2004. Multimedia presentation of the Civil Rights Movement — text, pictures, and audio. Includes two audio CDs.

  • We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement, by Akinyele Omowale Umoja. NYU Press, 2013.

  • When Did Southern Segregation Begin?, by John David Smith (Editor), C. Vann Woodward (Editor). Palgrave Macmillan, 2001.

  • When the Spirit Says Sing! The Role of Freedom Songs in the Civil Rights Movement, by Kerran Sanger. Taylor & Francis Inc, 1995. Analysis of the role freedom songs played in the Movement and non-violent strategy and tactics. RARE.

  • Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?, by Martin Luther King. Harper & Row, 1967. Thoughts on the Movement, Black Power, race, poverty, justice, Vietnam, war & peace, nuclear arms race, etc.

  • Where Rebels Roost, Mississippi Civil Rights Revisited, by Susan Orr-Klopfer. 2005. The struggle for civil rights in the Mississippi Delta and the role of the state in maintaining segregation and repressing the Movement. Available at Mississippi Civil Rights & Delta Blues Bookstore.

  • Whitey Joins the Revolution: My Time With the Movement, by Franklyn Peterson. Self. 2013. Personal memoir of a CORE activist.

  • Who Speaks for the Negro?, by Robert Penn Warren. Random House, 1965. Collection of interviews & oral histories. RARE.

  • Why We Can't Wait, by Dr. Martin Luther King. Harper & Row, 1963. The story of the Birmingham Campaign and analysis and history of the Movement.

  • Witness At Philadelphia (MS), by Florence Mars, Lynn Eden. Louisiana State University Press, 1977. A white native of Philadelphia MS, recounts the circumstances of the murder of Chaney, Schwerner, and Goodman, her reaction, and her arrest for crossing the color line.

  • Witness to the Truth: My Struggle for Human Rights in Louisiana, by John H. Scott, with Cleo Scott Brown. University of South Carolina Press, 2003. Personal story of a grass-roots, local Movement leader in Lake Providence, Louisiana.

  • Women and the Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1965, by Davis W. Houck and David E. Dixon. University Press of Mississippi, 2009. Speeches & addresses (full text transcripts) from 39 Freedom Movement women.

  • Women in the Civil Rights Movement: Trailblazers and Torchbearers, by Vicki Crawford. Indiana University Press, 1994. Collection of academic papers presented to 1988 conference.

  • The Words of Martin Luther King, Edited by Coretta Scott King. Newmarket Press, 1983.

  • Words of Protest, Words of Freedom: Poetry of the American Civil Rights Movement and Era, edited by Jeffrey Lamar Coleman. Duke University Press Books, 2012.

  • The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement, by Bob Zellner. New South Books, 2008. Memoir and autobiography of SNCC member Bob Zellner.

  • You Came Here to Die, Didn't You, by Sherie Labedis. Smokey Hill Books, 2011. Memoir of SCOPE summer volunteer on South Carolina voter-registration project in 1965. Available from www.sherielabedis.com/book.

  • You Must Be from the North: Southern White Women in the Memphis Civil Rights Movement, Kimberly K. Little. University Press of Mississippi, 2009.

Online Books
Music & Audio
Video


Webspinner: webmaster@crmvet.org
(Labor donated)